From Gizmag: Alpod mobile home shows its metal

Gizmag has an article on the Alpod mobile home. It’s called a mobile home, but at 480 sq. ft. one can easily classify it as a tiny house. It doesn’t have wheels, yet the home is designed to be carried on a trailer to its destination.

Alpod Model on Trailer
Alpod Model on Trailer
Alpod Interior
Alpod Interior

 

Why there are not more examples of the manufactured or modular home industries supplying modern tiny houses is a question of demand. There are businesses constructing tiny houses on wheels, but nothing like the manufactured, modular housing companies. Besides people stuck in their thinking about what a house should be, imagination seems to go out the window when it comes to providing models to the public. Nevertheless, the modular housing makers have consistently offered incredible, modern designs at the size of a typical house. Here are some on Curbed, some of which qualify as a tiny home or range in size from small to average size.

K6 by KitHAUS
K6 by KitHAUS

 designboom also has an article on the Alpod:

 

Marketwatch.com: Why you might retire to a tiny house — by choice

A wonderful article at Marketwatch.com on the reasons for going tiny as one gets older. They mention these things:

  1. Less expense.
  2. Less cleaning and maintenance.
  3. Can be used to get closer to locations and family.
  4. And easier to get around and do daily functions.
  5. Weed one off of the collecting things cycle.

These are really valid reasons for anyone wanting to go tiny. Some people find spending the greater part of a weekend cleaning, doing laundry, and mowing grass very onerous, preferring to minimize the chores in order to pursue other things, for instance. Most people work hard enough as it is than to have to give up free time for such things.

Why do we need any more than this when we are older and less capable of physical effort?

Here is a video on just this subject:

Illegal Tiny House

Illegal Vancouver Tiny House
Illegal Vancouver Tiny House

 

Here is an article on Small House Bliss about a house up for sale in Vancouver as the result of permitting. I note this particular article because of the revulsion I have in terms of the oppressive codes in so-called “free countries”. I won’t go into that here and will wait for a future article devoted to codes and regulations, but I like to point out that some places are so repressive that it is almost impossible to build a tiny house. This is why when one views TV programs that feature such structures many times the houses are on wheels to skirt central authority.

I know that many might say that codes are necessary to protect the neighborhood due to safety issues. However, that is where the codes should stop! Most go well beyond practical considerations and are meant to assume power over individuals as well as subjugate the populace into conformity. I am not saying this description is appropriate in this case. It is reasonable in a neighborhood to expect inspection for safety pitfalls and such. Nevertheless, the remedy is too punitive and severe as to result in the structure’s sale.

At any rate, this article has several pictures about what can be done to turn a garage/storage shed into an extremely nice dwelling at an affordable cost.

 

http://smallhousebliss.com/2015/12/13/illegal-vancouver-tiny-house/

Darla’s Tiny House

This particular design is entirely open which, along with the tall ceilings, creates a feeling of spaciousness. Also, because of the simple open space inside, the activity areas are easily changed. However, because of the orientation of the entrance, the best layout generally is the one portrayed.

The floor plan is rather simple, but attempts an artistic flare with successive vertical rectilinear forms and a walk-through that brings one to the front door. The bathroom has a different roof line and compliments the recess that forms the entrance.

Darla's tiny house floor plan.
Darla’s tiny house floor plan.
Darla's Tiny House3
The front of the house with its’ simple ordered design. Primarily cinder-block, the house is 346 sq. ft.
This is the front of the house with an alternate configuration.
This is the front of the house with an alternate configuration having an entrance instead of a window.
The alternate configuration at night.
The alternate configuration at night.
A straight-on view of the front.
A straight-on view of the front. The front entrance is to the left walk-way, around the corner.
Proceeding around to the side patio.
Proceeding around to the side patio.
The patio and beginning to see some of the bathroom extension.
The patio and beginning to see some of the bathroom extension.
A closer look at the patio.
A closer look at the patio and a side of the bathroom extension. Notice the design of the roof lines.
The patio and bathroom extension.
The patio and bathroom extension.
The back of the bathroom extension.
The back of the bathroom extension. Notice how the corners on the right mimic the roof line on the left.
Here we see the entrance and the vertical sculptural forms that leads to it.
Here we see the entrance and the vertical, sculptural forms that leads to it, emphasizing the rectilinear design.
Showing the north side of the house.
Showing the north side of the house.
North elevation.
North elevation.
North side view at a higher elevation.
North side view at a higher elevation.
Looking at the walk-through to the entrance.
Looking at the walk-through to the entrance.
The entrance.
The entrance.
Peeking through the entry door into the living area.
Peeking through the entry door into the living area.
The living area and the sleeping area.
The living area and the sleeping area.
A dining area with the bed to the left.
A dining area with the bed to the left.
Kitchen/dining area with the living area and entrance to the right.
Kitchen/dining area with the living area and entrance to the right.
Looking back from the bed
Looking back from the bed, across the living area with the entrance to the left and the bathroom door directly ahead.
The bathroom vanity.
The bathroom vanity.
Standing in the shower cabinet
Standing in the shower cabinet, looking through to the closet with the vanity on the right.
Standing in front of the closet
Standing in front of the closet and looking back toward the shower cabinet and toilet.

 

One of the nicest part of this design is the simplicity, and therefore, the ease at which this house could be constructed. Most likely the cost is low to produce this structure because of the lack of segmentation. The only separate space is the bathroom. Not only would this tiny house work as a main residence, but would work well as a comfy guest house. Another significant cost reduction would occur due to the use of standard items such as windows and doors. This little house maybe simple; yet it is artistically pleasing.

HBosler

Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait