Peter’s Tiny House

Peter’s Tiny House is one based on my favorite geometric shape, the square. Although a great part of this square belongs to the outdoors, this tiny house has a substantial feeling of space. The house occupies 469 sq. ft. of enclosed space with 256 sq. ft. of covered patio.

The floor plan consists of 3 distinct architectural areas: the living room and bathroom area, the kitchen and dining area and the bedroom. The living room/bathroom and the bedroom radiate from the central kitchen in rectangles, whereas the kitchen maintains a square mimicking the overall shape of the entire structure.

Peter's Tiny House Floor Plan
Peter’s Tiny House Floor Plan

Each section maintains a different roofline, with the kitchen area the highest at 12 feet. The various areas gather further distinction by the use of different materials. The kitchen square brandishes a natural stone covering, while the rest of the house is sheathed in steel, except for the patio which introduces bleached wood siding. The use of different materials serves to accent different aspects of the architecture. The stone covering around the kitchen continues inside to accentuate the central nature of this room.

Diversion from the square occurs along the roofline of the bedroom and patio. It extends out to accommodate the modern column providing support. On the matter of the column, the pure blue of the column provides a color contrast to the warmer colors in the stone and to enhance the effect of the steel and bleached wood. It also provides a balance with the brighter colors inside, granting the blue part of the primary colors from the yellow on the walls and the red floor in the kitchen.

Peter's Tiny House Roof Over Patio and Bedroom.
Peter’s Tiny House Roof Over Patio and Bedroom.

 

Front of Peter's Tiny House.
Front of Peter’s Tiny House.
Directly in Front.
Directly in Front.
Front at an Angle.
Front at an Angle.
Side of House.
Side of House.
Side and Patio View Showing Different Roof-lines.
Side and Patio View Showing Different Roof-lines.
Side, Patio and Back of Peter's Tiny House.
Side, Patio and Back of Peter’s Tiny House.
Patio and Back Side View.
Patio and Back Side View.
Back of house with the bedroom section on the right.
Back of house with the bedroom section on the right.
Back and corner of the house.
Back and corner of the house.
Side opposite of patio with the bedroom section on the left and the kitchen area on the right.
Side opposite of patio with the bedroom section on the left and the kitchen area on the right. The combination of narrow and wider windows on corners of the house repeats around the house.
Coming back around to the front showing the stone clad kitchen section with the bedroom on the left and the front on the right.
Coming back around to the front showing the stone clad kitchen section with the bedroom on the left and the front on the right.
Front door with the kitchen on the right and the living room/bathroom on the left.
Front door with the kitchen on the right and the living room/bathroom on the left.
Living room looking towards kitchen with the bathroom on the left.
Living room looking towards kitchen with the bathroom on the left.
Looking toward the kitchen from the living room.
Looking toward the kitchen from the living room.
Looking at the living room from the kitchen with the patio to the left.
Looking at the living room from the kitchen with the patio to the left.
Looking up at the clerestory windows surrounding the bathroom.
Looking up at the clerestory windows surrounding the bathroom.
Another look at the bathroom clerestory windows.
Another look at the bathroom clerestory windows.
Looking up inside the bathroom.
Looking up inside the bathroom.
In the bathroom, looking toward the vanity and door.
In the bathroom, looking toward the vanity and door.
View of bathroom floor, looking toward the shower cabinet.
View of bathroom floor, looking toward the shower cabinet.
The shower cabinet.
The shower cabinet.
Kitchen counter and cabinets. The living room is to the left.
Kitchen counter and cabinets. The living room is to the left.
Dining area with the door to the bedroom on the right.
Dining area with the door to the bedroom on the right.
Showing the kitchen ceiling and its clerestory windows and pendant light.
Showing the kitchen ceiling and its clerestory windows and pendant light.
Kitchen area with the door to the bedroom on the left and the living room on the right.
Kitchen area with the door to the bedroom on the left and the living room on the right.
Door to the bedroom.
Door to the bedroom.
View of front door and living room.
View of front door and living room.
Showing the door to the kitchen from the bedroom with the patio on the left.
Showing the door to the kitchen from the bedroom with the patio on the left.
The patio on the left.
The patio on the left.
Patio door.
Patio door.
Looking at bed with the patio on the right and the dresser on the left.
Looking at bed with the patio on the right and the dresser on the left.
Dresser in the bedroom.
Dresser in the bedroom.
On the patio.
On the patio.

 

This design puts forth the strong idea that a modern look at the simplest geometric forms leads to an infinite number of possibilities. As can be seen in the main floor-plan, the foot print of this house forms a perfect square, which is hardly creatively restrictive. By switching sections of this design, by making the patio in the area of the bedroom and visa versa, for instance, one could free up space for a two bedroom house or a much larger bedroom. Even so, this house occupies less than 500 sq. ft., yet is quite spacious.

This is a little video I made of this house design:

HBosler

Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait

 

 

 

 

 

The Mid-Century A-Frame

When thinking of the mid-century, one rarely thinks of the A-frame. Yet the A-frame was a familiar notion at the time, mainly as a mountain getaway. Indeed, even to this day, the A-frame’s association with the woods and mountain cabins, strikes people as unusual when seen in other environments. Nevertheless, the A-frame has certain advantages over traditional forms.

The A-frame became very popular around 1957 after an article in the New York Times appeared about a beach house built by the modernist architect, Andrew Geller, on Long Island known as the Elizabeth Reese House.

Elizabeth Reese House, Sagaponack, New York, Andrew Geller, 1955. (Courtesy Jake Gorst)




The main interest of an A-frame house comes from the ease and inexpensive construction. Like a dome, the A-frame forms the roof at the same time as the walls, thereby, making the building quicker and less costly. A little time after the publication of the New York Times article, even Macy’s got in on the act and began offering A-frame kits. In fact, purchasing in kit form was quite common as the A-frame reached a peak in popularity.

In 1950, San Francisco architect, John Campbell, designed and built the 540 square foot Leisure House. This led to kits for sale for $5000 and acclaim for his design, further fueling the modernist interest in this type of building on the west coast.

 

Leisure House, California, John Campbell, 1950.
Leisure House, California, John Campbell, 1950.

Modernists enjoyed working with the A-frame because of its basic artistic nature. The triangle finds a supreme place in the arts. From the pediment of the Parthenon to the design of a Renaissance painting, the triangle, along with the rectangle and circle, forms one the simplest and fundamental shapes.

The A-frame, as the result of odd space near the bottom sides and at the very top, were incorporated into larger structures in hotels, resorts, shops and gas stations. Many times the triangle formed a central area with an extension or extensions radiating outward. The most iconic image of the A-frame in the United States is the lodge or hotel cabin.

 

Aspen Inn Motel - Fort Klamath, OR, United States. Super cute A Frame Cabins
Aspen Inn Hotel, Fort Klamath, Oregon.

Because of the unique space of the A-frame, most usually have a loft, typically a sleeping area.

Aspen Inn Motel - Fort Klamath, OR, United States. Upstairs loft in the A-frame.  Great for kids.
Aspen Inn Hotel, Fort Klamath, Oregon. (Loft Area).

The A-frame is extremely simple to construct and kits are still available.

Example of the framing of an A-frame, small house.

The A-frame can have a very modern look with plenty of glass and some slight modifications to the basic design.

THE A FRAME HOUSE:

Or one can settle for a rather plain, common look for the A-frame.



cabin fever:

a frame cabin:

a-frame:

Duplex Paris:

Rustic gets a modern edge but keeps its pedigree in a lakeside vacation cabin, thanks to a thoughtful renovation by its architect owner:

Modern A frame cabin:

A-Frame Resurgence - A-Frame House - Bob Vila:

small modern house designs in triangular shape:

10 A-frame House Designs – For A Simple Yet Unforgettable Look:

http://www.decoist.com/2011-11-10/black-cladded-vb4-extension-creating-a-new-sun-filled-dream-home/:

A mid-century modern A-frame in Atlanta via Northcrest Modern:

Beautiful A Frame in the snow:

Cottage Life-- Mobile -- Straight As for these beautifully designed A-frame cabins:

Before & After: An A-Frame Cottage Gets an A+ Renovation | Design*Sponge:

Contemporary take on A-frame. Architect Kengo Kuma's Y-Hütte, in Eastern Japan:

Modern and Luxurious Tiny A-frame Cabin 001:

An Ultra-Minimalist Cabin Takes A-Frames To The Limit | Co.Design: business + innovation + design:

AMAZING A-FRAME HOMES: mid-century #modern living room with #natural lighting + #retro furniture:

Mount Washington A-Frame:

Catshuis aan Zee - huis in A-vorm:

illuminated A-frame at night:

Desanka's Visionary Lux Lodge — House Tour | Apartment Therapy:

A Frame Home Decorating Ideas | Frame House | Home Exterior Design Ideas:

A Frame | Flickr - Photo Sharing!:

a frame houses | The A-frame is the epic combo of modern meets mountain meets retro ...:

Far Meadow Base Camp, Sierra National Forest:

A-frame:

Contemporary-mountain-House-Design-Ideas-with-Extraordinary-and-Beautiful-View-in-Snowy-image, Pyrenees, Paris:

An A-Frame Cabin for a Snowboarding Family in Whistler:

hiroshi nakamura, hiroshi nakamura & NAP, japanese architecture, nasu tepee, teepee-inspired homes, timber homes, small homes, small homes in the woods:

 

Here are some mid-century A-frame designs:

Mid-Century Vacation Home Graphic | The Johnsons' Mid-Century Time Travel Guide #midcentury #vacationhome #illustration:

 

Vintage Cabins | Mid-Century Modern | A-Frame House | Residential Architecture | Home Ideas | Interior Design:

No roof rake needed.:

ARCHINOWHERE 06_study Art Print:

Modern Vacation Homes Atomic A Frames Chalets Eames Era Floor Plans Mid Century | eBay:

Mid-Century Modern Vacation Home Plans, via grainedit.com/2009/05/25/mid-century-modern-home-plans:

//:

a-frame interior:

 

The A-frame makes a good fit for a tiny house. The open plan and the lack of expensive and time-consuming labor, allow for a modern house requiring less maintenance. The fact that the roof is the walls means less painting, for example. For a house off the grid, the angle of the roof permits the perfect collection of solar energy if pointed in the right direction.

The construction of an A-frame house does not demand sophisticated knowledge of techniques as used in an average house. Rather, it is like two lean-tos built against each other or a hard shell “tent”. Once the few angles are known, the building becomes rather simple.

Artistically, a modern style comes just as easy as the construction. Roofing made of modern materials such as steel and interiors utilizing the many modern surfaces available today, plus the edition of mid-century modern furniture, takes the A-frame from backwoods cabin to modern dwelling.

Just a treat, if you are from the US, especially from the western US, you remember the ubiquitous at the time Der Weinerschnitzel:

A-frame Roof Weinerschnitzel Restaurant in Whittier, California.
The Original International House of Pancakes.
The original Tastee-Freez, Perris, California.
A Former Heap-Big-Beef, Mill Brae, California.
A Former Nickerson Farms in Arizona.



Whataburger A Frame
Whataburger in Corpus Christi, Texas.

HBosler

Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait