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Living in a Tent?

Actually, this article is not about living in a tent but living in a structure that uses fabric for roofing. Although in the past, skins have been used in structures like tepees and yurts, now modern fabrics are being used in even large scale structures like airports and stadiums.

Denver International Airport (Forbes)
Denver International Airport (Forbes)

 

Pusan Stadium, South Korea.
Pusan Stadium, South Korea. (Landrell Architects.)

 

Since we know that modern versions of yurts use modern fabrics, then why is it not possible to build a tiny house utilizing the current materials available?

From the outset, the sophisticated materials contained in a modern fabric, large scale construction is not necessary to consider. Generally, they require special glues or radio frequency applications to seal seams. They also can require high tension. If you are interested in a discussion of the various sorts of architectural fabrics, check out the link to  FabricArchitect.

We will discuss the material accepted for the making of yurts as the possible material for a tiny structure. In most cases, fabric covering yurts consists of a tightly woven, heavy canvas or cotton duck material with a coating of some sort such as acrylic polyurethane. Then will come an insulation layer of, say, felt and then a lining material usually of a polyester fabric. The main outside layer almost always consist of a canvas material whether cotton or a blend of cotton, nylon, polyester, etc…

Rather than reinvent the wheel, here are some videos that will give you some ideas.

 

 

 

 

To give an idea of how the concept of the use of tent roofing in constructing a small inexpensive dwelling. Take a look at the design of this A-frame. Instead of more expensive materials and a longer construction time of building roofing in a traditional way, canvas tent material is stretched over the frame. Insulation and lining, such as included in a yurt can be utilized here.

 

A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover.
A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover.

 

A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover Removed.
A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover Removed.

 

A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover Removed. (Detail)
A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover Removed. (Detail)

 

A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover Removed. (Detail)
A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover Removed. (Detail)

 

A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover.
A Frame with Stretched Canvas Cover.

 

One can readily see that such a structure would not only be relatively easily built but with much less expense as well.

By looking at the design above, the imagination could turn the A-frame into a cylindrical structure or even a more gabled pattern. As long as the shape could take a stretched fabric, almost anything is possible.

 

 

Modern Flooring

Although not meant to detail every modernist floor system, this article will examine a few that I have personal experience with.

One of the most admirable features of modernist interiors, in my opinion, is the flooring pervasive during the period of the mid-century.

Terrazzo Flooring. (Photo from Atomic Ranch.)
Terrazzo Flooring. (Photo from Atomic Ranch.)

Although one would suppose by many of the current ideas about mid-century styling that the period was dominated by bright whites and pastel or bright colors, stained wood became an important part of the mid-century interior. Tongue and groove ceilings, wood wall paneling, and wood floors were very important in many interiors. Today, the rustic or variable tones of wood would not have been of influence back then. Instead, mid-century architects and interior designers preferred a more even, consistent look. Of course, one must also realize that even back then there was a difference in style between what is called “organic”, International design and other trends. As far as the bulk of American residential styles, those of large-scale developers such as Eichler and Haver, the surfaces tended to conform to a consistent standard that favored the use of manufactured or engineered surfaces not much different from the International style but in terms of wood flooring laminates and composite materials had not yet held sway.

One must remember that materials today considered on the higher end of price were more readily available on a mass scale. For instance, cabinets made of composite materials today might have been made then with joined woods or a fine grade of plywood maybe even covered with a veneer of high quality.

mid-century-modern-wood-floor-after-glowing-hardwood-floors-original-tongue-and-groove-ceiling-1

Some of the types of wood favored during the mid-century include teak in various colors, rosewood, mahogany, walnut, beech, and oak. Naturally, teak was mainly used for furniture but could be emulated for paneling or other wood details. Rosewood also was mainly used for furniture even though it could be found in cabinets and other specialty applications.

In an attempt to maintain the integrity of a modernist home, some trends of today would not be suitable such as bamboo. However, this does not mean engineered surfaces such as laminates might not be too out of place, especially if one considers the current price of materials.

This is a question I get all the time which is really a conundrum. In maintaining a building from a particular period, how far does one go in staying with original materials when something cannot be restored or repaired? The problem with the modernists is their philosophy, creativity, and love of the new would certainly suggest that they not only would accept contemporary materials but also advocate for them. What I think they would object to is the current inclination for conformity and uniformity, especially in residential interiors. The overuse of neutrals such as white and blacks and various shades of grey would have been entirely too restrictive.

Contemporary Modern Living Room Design contemporary-living-room

It goes without saying that these rustic grayish stained laminates would not work very well. In fact, if one wishes to play it safe, keeping with a range of color from medium to light is better. Another thing to remember, for small spaces, dark colors tend to shrink the look of the size of the room, light colors can open things up because they reflect more light in a broader spectrum.

Cork Flooring. (Photo from https://www.homestratosphere.com/cork-flooring-pro.)
Cork Flooring. (Photo from https://www.homestratosphere.com/cork-flooring-pro.)

One of my favorites and the one I grew up with is stained and polished concrete. Growing up in the southwestern US, most houses had foundations of a concrete slab with no need for basements or elevations above the ground. So the use of the concrete as the floor certainly made cost savings and a beautiful modern surface. Generally, the concrete was stained in a rusty red or a yellowish brown, at least in my neighborhood. Unfortunately, as time passed and tastes changed, many of the floors were covered up with carpeting, or linoleum.

Concrete Floor. (Photo from Dickoatts.com.)
Concrete Floor. (Photo from Dickoatts.com.)

Obviously, concrete flooring has many advantages, in particular with the resins and epoxies that can be applied at this time. The actual staining of concrete today produces some incredible effects and is remarkably inexpensive, relatively speaking. It is also something a DIYer can do with a little education in the matter.

Umber Stained Concrete. (Photo from http://mvlconcrete.com/blog/tag/stained-concrete/.)
Umber Stained Concrete. (Photo from http://mvlconcrete.com/blog/tag/stained-concrete/.)

Photo by Marc Mueller on Pexels.com.
Photo by Marc Mueller on Pexels.com.

Concrete floors can be stained with remarkable patterns and intense colors such as deep blues and reds.

One of my true favorites is Linoleum. Not only does it come in an unending amount of patterns but it can be applied in such a way as to create amazing designs. Indeed, from residential to commercial applications Linoleum was laid down with contrasting borders and elaborately carved graphics.

Linoleum Pattern Using Tiles. (Photo from https://www.armstrongflooring.com/commercial/en-us
Linoleum Pattern Using Tiles. (Photo from https://www.armstrongflooring.com.)

Congoleum Gold Seal Linoleum Flooring, Life Magazine, 14 Feb 1955.
Congoleum Gold Seal Linoleum Flooring, Life Magazine, 14 Feb 1955.

Marmoleum in a Pattern.
Marmoleum in a Pattern.

Tile and Sheet Linoleum. (Photo from https://www.armstrongflooring.com/commercial/en-us/products/linoleum/linoart-colorette-sheet.html).
Tile and Sheet Linoleum. (Photo from https://www.armstrongflooring.com/commercial/en-us/products/linoleum/linoart-colorette-sheet.html.)

I have in my own house an elaborate Linoleum pattern from tiles installed in my living room.

Laying down Linoleum tiles in a pattern is remarkably easy and surprisingly inexpensive. Perfect for the DIYer, the tiles do not require arcane tools or any sort of fancy equipment to install. Also, once you get the idea of how to apply inlays, even that sort of application seems rather easy.

The last floor that I will mention and which is probably my favorite of them all is terrazzo.

Terrazzo is an ancient flooring going back to the Egyptians. It consists of a cement or binder with chips of material thrown in for the pattern. Due to the frequency of cracking in large sheets, the practice of separating sections by brass or metal strips came about and if anyone has been in an old bank building with terrazzo on the floor, he or she probably remembers the shiny brass lines separating areas of a pattern or sections of the floor.

As one can see from above, terrazzo floors stretch one’s energy and time to create such beautiful surfaces. However, forsaking the traditional methods epoxy can make the job a lot easier, simpler, and much less expensive.

These are a few of the types of floors prevalent in the mid-century with terrazzo and Linoleum some of the most common materials used in commercial buildings. Linoleum probably dominated all the others and even, to the shock of people restoring buildings,  came to cover up all sorts of floors including hardwood surfaces.

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

The Final Design for My Tiny Space

These video and pictures include the final footprint of my tiny new space that will undergo construction in November 2018. The furniture and cabinetry are from IKEA but I may do all the design and construction myself which I will post as a separate article. I am so busy that I may not have time to do too many things. I would like to do the bed, the dining set, the side chairs, and the desk if possible. The only change I am contemplating is exposed beams for the ceiling rather than drywall and a solid door from the outside. The other entrance and the bathroom may be frosted glass. The countertops will either be Formica or tile. I am not fond of the current trend of stone, although Corian is not bad. Essentially, anything from the mid-century is fine with me.

 

 

Video:

This video is a little slow and includes my music. This is partly because a friend of mine, who I mean to see it, had a stroke and suffered from some visual distortions. As for the music, I am very much a classical music fan and writing my music means I do not have to worry about copyright infringement.

 

 

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

Basic House Framing

I started to write an article on basic framing for those who are very much into a do it yourself construction of a tiny house. I have learned first hand many of the concepts involved, some by trial and error. In order that walls, openings, windows, and doors are properly fit together, one needs to know some of the methods involved. For instance, do you know the three major ways in which corners are joined together in framing? Not only does the framing need to account for the connection of interior and exterior surfaces but also how the roof attached to the frames and the strategies for the connection of interior and exterior walls.

Nevertheless, as I was doing a little research on the subject, I realized that I would be repeating what is already available and it might be better to simply point the reader to some excellent information that explains everything so concisely. Not only would all this information be of benefit to those deciding whether to build their own tiny house but also those who would like to construct a cabin, shed, or other small building.

(Since I will be including links to various resources, please let me know if any of these links get broken.)


The Deck

 

The deck is what your structure will sit on.  We will keep things to the basics, here. Obviously, foundations can get a bit more complicated, especially with basements.

 

Click Graphic For Link.
Click Graphic For Link.

 

 

 

 

The Walls

 

Walls are different thicknesses as the result of the methods and orientation in using them. For instance, in a stick frame building in contemporary America, exterior walls can be composed of 2 x 6 lumber with 2 x 4 lumber for interior compartmentalization. Furthermore, walls made of brick, concrete, or concrete block will be of various sizes. Also, residential structures, as with any structure, can vary the materials used for walls based upon elevation or aspect.

The easiest and most common method of building walls in a residential environment is stick framing. One of the things to take most note of is the framing involved in corners, windows, and in the attachment of the floor and roof systems.

 

Link to Basic Wall Framing Page.




 

The above video is in parts. Watching all parts will give you a much better understanding of framing.

 

 

The video above has some interesting things to consider when framing a structure.

 




The Roof

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, much more goes on besides framing. Electrical, plumbing, HVAC, venting, and other technologies go into building a house, studio, or advanced shed. However, as daunting as it seems, with just a little bit of knowledge, it really is not all that difficult. It’s more hard work than mentally taxing.

 



HBosler

 

My Tiny Modern Luxury

Upcoming in the next three months, I have a wonderful project to build a tiny space. As part of a larger building, one might consider this as a self-contained suite or apartment. Nevertheless, the suite will have a footprint of 453 square feet.

When the building begins, I will document the various stages until the final result and post the ongoing developments. Although, not in the current plans, another patio may be considered on the bathroom side.

The Footprint of the Tiny Suite.
The Footprint of the Tiny Suite.

Obviously, since this is attached to a larger structure, the footprint is such that it could be made entirely free standing.

The following shows first the main space and then the patio and at the last the bathroom area.

This is a View of the Entry Door from the Kitchenette.
This is a View of the Entry Door from the Kitchenette.

Another View from the Kitchenette.
Another View from the Kitchenette.

On the same side as the entry door, a bank of cabinets provides an incredible amount of storage as well as a good size work surface and entertainment platform. It is possible that instead of one of the base cabinets an empty space below the surface will work as a desk.

Looking Back Toward the Kitchenette.
Looking Back Toward the Kitchenette.

In the above illustration, we see not only the kitchenette but also the small dining area and to the very right the armoire that supplies closet space to the sleeping area. The kitchenette will have a convection oven, induction stove top, and microwave. The chairs are of my design and can be found on diymodernfurniture.com.

It should be noted that this suite derives a large influence from mid-century modern design. Also, notice the use of the primary colors as a decorating scheme.

Looking from the Entrance.
Looking from the Entrance.



The above view shows a good deal of the space, on the left, the armoire, to the right, the bank of storage, and straight ahead the bed and relaxation areas.

Looking from the Bed.
Looking from the Bed.

Even though a large amount of storage is packed into a small place, the room looks spacious and comfortable.

A View of the Bedroom Area with My Artwork.
A View of the Bedroom Area with My Artwork.

The bed is a full-size bed. This space has room for a bedside table. Large windows provide plenty of natural light.

Looking Toward the French Doors that Lead to the Patio.
Looking Toward the French Doors that Lead to the Patio.

A private sitting area for reading makes for a pleasant ambiance. The French doors lead to the semi-circular patio.

We Look Back Toward the Entry Door.
We Look Back Toward the Entry Door.

Seeing Out Through the French Patio Doors.
Seeing Out Through the French Patio Doors.

The Patio.
The Patio.

The Patio.
The Patio.

The Gate to the Patio.
The Gate to the Patio.

The Door to the Bathroom.
The Door to the Bathroom.

As one will see, the bathroom has plenty of space for storage.

The Storage Space Available.
The Storage Space Available.

To the left, barely visible is the door to the outside where another patio may take shape.

The Shower Cabinet.
The Shower Cabinet.

The Shower Cabinet, Toilet, and Vanity.
The Shower Cabinet, Toilet, and Vanity.

A Good Size Window on the Right.
A Good Size Window on the Right.

The Exterior Door.
The Exterior Door.



Well, this project is in the planning stage. After the searing heat in this part of the country abates somewhat and new solar panels go up on the roof, then the tearing down and rebuilding begins.

As you can see, a complete living environment can be made without consuming a lot of space. One of the main strategies to achieve this is by providing an open flow, placing furniture and builtins to the sides of the spaces and not breaking up spaces into uncomfortable severity. Once done, I think this tiny suite will furnish a complete and satisfying habitat.

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

Folding Dining Set

Searching around for a space-saving alternative to a regular stationary table and chairs, one finds all sorts of design styles but it seems that only a few configurations are possible when looking for a dining set that folds up.

The most common setup has a table and benches that fold down from the wall or a wall hung box. Sometimes called a Murphy table, they basically function in the same way, although one can find modern to rustic in terms of style.



Murphy Table.
Murphy Table.

 

Murphy Table.
Murphy Table.

 

Murphy Table.
Murphy Table.

 

Murphy Table.
Murphy Table.

 

The second type of fold out dining set is an independent unit that is usually on rollers. These units can also include stools and benches.

 

Folding Table.
Folding Table.

 

Folding Table.
Folding Table.

 

Folding Table with Chairs.
Folding Table with Chairs.

 

Another type of folding set hinges from a wall or a cabinet connected to a wall and suspends the table surface from a cable from the wall or ceiling.

 

Table Suspension.
Table Suspension.

 

A Table Suspended from the Wall.
A Table Suspended from the Wall.

 

A Table Suspended from the Ceiling.
A Table Suspended from the Ceiling.

 

The advantage of suspending a table surface from a ceiling is that when constructed with pulleys, the table can be raised out-of-the-way. However, the disadvantage is that the surface will swing unless anchored in some way. Attached to a wall will give a lot of stability.

There is another system that has a hinged support that folds out horizontally from the wall and supports the surface. This is good for small surfaces and desks but not for anything substantial unless one has a solid metal frame or a robust support. People have used wood doors cut to size and then hinged to provide adequate support. A good piece of 3/4″ plywood will work as well.


Horizontal Support Table.
Horizontal Support Table.

 

Horizontal Support Table.
Horizontal Support Table.

 

Horizontal Support Table.
Horizontal Support Table.

 

In terms of fold out tables and dining sets, there is nothing new under the sun. At any rate, this article will attempt to show you in detail how you might make your own table by illustrations and instructions.

 

What will be attempted here is a table used for dinning in a small space which when not in such use can easily be turned into a desk, especially one that can fit up against a wall to consume as little space as possible. The other characteristic that we will look for is an independent unit that we can move.

 

 

The following illustrations provide the instructions to construct a piece of furniture that will furnish two iterations, a dining table and a desk. However, keep in mind that the basic instructions here can be expanded to create a much larger table. In an effort to keep things as simple as possible and to use as few resources as necessary, the scope of the design has been restricted.

 

The Fold Up Table.
The Fold Up Table.

 

The Fold Up Table.
The Fold Up Table.

 

The Fold Up Table Top Dimensions.
The Fold Up Table Top Dimensions.

 

The Fold Up Table Dimensions.
The Fold Up Table Dimensions in Inches and Feet.

 

The Fold Up Table Dimensions.
The Fold Up Table Dimensions Including Base Width.

 

The Fold Up Table Dimensions. (The Hinged Sides.)
The Fold Up Table Dimensions. (The Hinged Sides.)

 

From this point on, we will call the unhinged side that we saw as the “front” and the hinged base sides as “sides”. The side we have yet to see, we will call the “back”. The back is where the table top will hinge down to rest against the legs to shorten the piece into a desk.

The place to start is with the front and back base support structure. These, as well as the sides, are formed with 1 x 4 lumber (3/4″ x 3-1/2″) and attached with pocket hole joinery and glue.

 

The "Front" and "Back" Base Support Dimensions.
The “Front” and “Back” Base Support Dimensions.

 

Joining the Pieces of the Front and Back.
Joining the Pieces of the Front and Back with Pocket Hole Joinery and Glue.

 

Once the front and back are made, the sides come next.

 

Showing the Attachment of the Legs for the Sides.
Showing the Attachment of the Legs for the Sides.

 

Since the sides are held together by hinges, we first secure a 28-1/4″ length of 1 x 4 at each corner with pocket joints and glue (or by wood or construction screws if you desire a different method).

 

Showing the Attachment of the Legs for the Sides.
Showing the Attachment of the Legs for the Sides.

 

Applying the Corner Hinges.
Applying the Corner Hinges.

 

Hinges are applied to the side leg supports and the 1′ sections which will start to form the collapsible section of the frame.

 

Applying the Side Hinges.
Applying the Side Hinges that Connect the Two Side Legs.

 

On the outside middle of the side a hinge connects the front and back sections which are attached to the side legs. The hinge is mounted to the outside and not the inside. On the inside, we have hinges on both the side legs. This allows for the section to fold in.

 

The Hinge System on the Inside and Outside.
The Hinge System on the Inside and Outside.

 

Another View of the Hinges.
Another View of the Hinges.

 

The base is finished and is ready for the table top in two pieces.

 

The Hinges on the Two Piece Table Top.
The Hinges on the Two Piece Table Top.

 

The hinges fit in the center of the separation between the two 2′ x 4′ table top sections and on the seam close to the edge on each side. The two pieces should be centered both front and back on the base with the front section of the table top attached to the front frame as shown in the above illustration. This prevents the top from moving but allows for the back section to fold down when this furniture is used as a desk. To restate: Only the front section is permanently attached.

 

Showing the Orientation of the Table Top Hinges.
Showing the Orientation of the Table Top Hinges.

 

The Table with All Hinges Installed and the Top Attached.
The Table with All Hinges Installed and the Top Attached.

 

The Top of the Table.
The Top of the Table.

 

Showing the Folding Action.
Showing the Folding Action of the Frame.

 

Showing the Folding Action and the Table Top.
Showing the Folding Action and the Table Top.

 

Showing the Folding Action and the Table.
Showing the Folding Action and the Table.

 

Showing the Folding Action and the Relation to the Table Top.
Showing the Folding Action and the Relation to the Table Top.

 

Showing the Folding Action and the Relation to the Table Top.
Showing the Folding Action and the Relation to the Table Top.

 

The Table Frame Folded and Half the Top Dropped for the Desk.
The Table Frame Folded and Half the Top Dropped for the Desk.

 

The Desk with the Chair.
The Desk with a Chair.

 

The Desk.
The Desk.

 

The Desk, the Table, and a Chair.
The Desk, the Table, and a Chair.

 

Because of the length of this article, I did not include a design for a folding chair–even though I have one. Actually, a set of folding chairs is not tremendously expensive to purchase at many locations which is most likely the best solution. Nevertheless, I will include instructions on a folding chair in a short while. And possibly the very attractive one in the above illustrations, as well.


Materials

 

  • Pocket hole joint kit with screws for 1-1/2″ material.
  • Exterior glue.
  • (Optional) 2-1/4 to 2-1/2″ wood or construction screws if not using pocket hole joinery for the side legs.
  • Obviously, 1 sheet of plywood or other sheet material in 4′ x 4′ dimensions for the table top.
  • Four 1 x 4 x 8′ lumber for the frame. The frame can also be made of plywood by cutting out lengths that match the cut list below.
  • Nine hinges (around 4″ to 5″).
  • (Optional) Nail sliders or gliders or some other method of separating the bottom of the furniture from the floor.

 

Tools

 

  • Drill. (Remember to pre-drill if using wood or construction screws.)
  • Circular saw or Jigsaw for cutting sheet material.
  • A straight edge or guide for cutting sheet material.
  • Pocket hole screwdriver and/or drill bit.
  • Device for measuring the boards and carpenter’s pencil.
  • A router if rounding or beveling the edges.

 

Note: The Materials and Tools list do not include paint, stain, and finishing supplies since these will vary considerably depending on your choice of how this piece of furniture will look. However, to save on labor, an electric sander is highly recommended.

 

Cut These Lengths for the Frame.
Cut These Lengths for the Frame.

 

HBosler

Self-Portrait, Oil on Canvas.
Self-Portrait, Oil on Canvas.

 

A Lounger For Outside

Since the outdoors is a fundamental part of living for not only tiny house owners but people in general, I have included these instructions for an easy to make patio lounger made of just 2 x 4 material that is excellent for a patio or covered area. In the spirit of DIY, which can be of interest to tiny house people, the step by step instructions below will allow you to make your own unique piece of patio furniture.


Lounger
Lounger.

 

There is nothing like lounging around the pool or on a sunny deck. Lounge chairs are a part of relaxing and resting. This patio lounger is not only stylish but also easy to put together.

 

Patio Lounger.
Patio Lounger.

 

In fact, this relaxing chair only uses one wood material, standard 2 x 4 (1-1/2″ x 3-1/2″) lumber.

 

Patio Lounger.
Patio Lounger.

 

We begin by constructing the sides of the lounger first.

 

Patio Lounger Side Dimensions.
Patio Lounger Side Dimensions.

 

The sides of the lounger are pieced together with exterior glue and pocket hole joints. Place the pocket hole joints facing the inside of the chair and, remember, that there are plugs made that will fill and hide the holes once puttied and sanded.

 

Looking at the Back Cross Connectors.
Looking at the Back Cross Connectors.

 

The 30″ back connectors are also attached with glue and pocket hole joints. However, the inside piece is joined as in the illustration with one pocket hole joint on the inside center and one on the bottom. The reason for this is that there are already pocket holes in the side pieces which would interfere with the connector’s joints.

 

The Back Cross Connector.
The Back Cross Connector.

 

The other cross connector is applied with joints facing front to the very back of the sides. (The other connector has been removed for clear viewing.)

 

Both 30″ Back Cross Connectors.
Both 30″ Back Cross Connectors.

 

The Back and Seat Side Piece.
The Back and Seat Side Piece.

 

The back side is attached to the seat side with pocket hole joints as shown in the above illustration. The top joints will secure the top cross back piece.

 

The 30″ Top Back and Seat Front Pieces.
The 30″ Top Back and Seat Front Pieces.

 

The 30″ top and front of the back and seat are connected as in the illustration.



The Attachment of 27″ Back and Seat Slats.
The Attachment of 27″ Back and Seat Slats.

 

The Attachment of 27″ Back and Seat Slats.
The Attachment of 27″ Back and Seat Slats.

 

The 7/16″ Gaps Between the Back Slats.
The 7/16″ Gaps Between the Back Slats.

 

The 5/16″ Gaps Between the Seat Slats.
The 5/16″ Gaps Between the Seat Slats.

 

If you wish, the gaps in the seat slats can be all the same width. The difference between back and seat as illustrated is purely aesthetic.

The back and seat slats may be placed either before attaching the seat frame to the outside frame or after.

 

The Seat Frame is Attached to the Outer Frame.
The Seat Frame is Attached to the Outer Frame.

 

The seat frame is attached to the front of the outer frame by use of a pocket hole joint on the bottom edge at the front as shown. The back is connected to the outer frame by using a couple of 2-1/2″ construction or wood screws through the back side frame and into the sides with the back leaning on the inner back cross beam support. It is important to secure the back while the chair is upright in the proper position. You want the point at which the seat sides and the legs touch the ground evenly and simultaneously so there is no rocking or legs off the ground.

 

The Lounger with Seat and Outer Frame Connected.
The Lounger with Seat and Outer Frame Connected.

 

Finished Lounger.
Finished Lounger.

 

Materials

 

  • Pocket hole joint kit with screws for 1-1/2″ material.
  • Exterior glue.
  • 2-1/2″ construction or wood screws.

 

Tools

 

  • Drill.
  • Miter Saw.
  • Pocket hole screwdriver and/or drill bit.
  • Philips screwdriver.
  • Device for measuring the boards.

 

Cutlist




HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

Do Your Own Cabinets

Many cabinets are simple boxes. Some have added drawers and movable shelves. They can also be quite expensive when purchased pre-made at cabinet shops and even home supply stores. However, making your own cabinets can save money, especially when you need custom sizes or shapes. Here we will examine some basic cabinet forms and shapes.

The dimensions of cabinets vary but some are rather standard to account for height and surface area.

 

Dimensions Showing Overall Placement.
Dimensions Showing Overall Placement.

Parts of Cabinetry.
Parts of Cabinetry.

 

As one can see from these diagrams, the distance from the wall to the edge of the countertop will be somewhere between 24 to 26 inches. The space on the wall from the countertop to the bottom of hanging cabinets is around 16 inches, whereas the wall cabinets will be around 12 inches from front to back. All these dimensions are flexible depending on the needs or applications of surfaces and storage areas.

Base cabinets do not need a toe kick but would benefit with one if the unit goes from surface to floor in one piece. The usual size of the toe kick is 3-1/2 inches deep and up to 4 inches tall. Cabinetry can also rely upon legs or platforms to remove them from direct contact with the floor.

 

 

Bathroom Vanity Design With Toe Kick.
Bathroom Vanity Design With Toe Kick.

 

Toe Kick.
Toe Kick.

 

A Cabinet Design on a Platform With Legs.
A Cabinet Design on a Platform With Legs.

 

This is a Unit on Legs With a Bit of a Twist.
This is a Unit on Legs With a Bit of a Twist.

 

Once you have a box and put legs, a platform, or a toe kick on it, the face of the cabinet will determine what kind of doors, drawers, and hardware will be used. A box can have just shelves or just doors with pivot hinges. Pivot hinges allow a door to swing on pegs fixed on the top and bottom of the door allowing it to sit flush with the edges or they are scissor sort of looking things that attach to the top and bottom of the cabinet and the door.

 

 

Pivot Hinge.
Pivot Hinge.

 

Another Pivot Hinge Configuration.
Another Pivot Hinge Configuration.

 

Obviously, anything can be a DIY project and pivot hinges are no exception. I have taken a simple mending plate, placed a wood screw through an end hole that is inserted into a washer then screwed into a cabinet door. Once the mending plates for the top and bottom of the door are affixed to the carcass of the cabinet box at the top and bottom, the door can swing on the screws. To prevent the screw head from digging into the cabinet where it pivots, a small piece of embedded metal such as a penny, dime, or any other sort of wear resistant material will prevent the screw head chewing up softer woods. Even a nail with a large enough head will work in this situation as long as it is short enough not to go through the thickness of the cabinet.

I use pivot hinges a lot because I like the modern look of inset doors. Of course, there are many types of hinges. An excellent description of the four basic types can be found at this LINK.

 

HardwareSource Website.
HardwareSource Website.


A video on hinges:

 

 

The fronts of cabinets are essentially of two types. One is without any front face and the other is made with a frame or piece attached to the cabinet carcass. Without a face frame, the cabinet is basically a box with doors or drawers designed to close flush with the cabinet or to hinge or shut against the cabinet body directly. With a face frame, usually, doors or drawers sit on the surface of the face frame when closed.

 

 

Basic Cabinet With Shelf and Face Frame.
Basic Cabinet With Shelf and Face Frame at 24″ wide x 36″ high.

 

For a good explanation of the different types of hinges and the different types of doors, Rockler has an in-depth examination of all the basic types. The type of front and the type of door hinge will determine the door’s dimensions to a large degree.

The following instructions will explain how you can make the above cabinet, which is simply to illustrate the basic construction. The same method may be used for cabinets in other dimensions such as width or height.

 

Sides of Cabinet.
Sides of Cabinet.

 

To begin construction of the cabinet, you will attach the bottom shelf to the sides even with the top edge of the toe kick.

 

The Side Dimension Including the Toe Kick.
The Side Dimension Including the Toe Kick.

 

In this case, the toe kick is 4″ tall and 3-1/2″ in depth. The side dimensions are 35″ tall by 23-1/4″ in depth.

 

The Toe Kick.
The Toe Kick.

 

To connect the shelf to the sides pocket hole joints are used with a quality interior/exterior glue.

 

Looking Underneath the Bottom Shelf.
Looking Underneath the Bottom Shelf.

 

Next, we attach the two back supports, which are 1 x 4 (3/4″ x 3-1/2″) lumber cut to 22-1/2″ lengths.

 

Back Support Pieces.
Back Support Pieces.

 

The top support piece should account for the placement of pocket joint holes that will come through the cleats used to affix a countertop. So bring the pocket holes down a bit. (Refer to the graphic further down in the article.)

 

Attachment of the Toe Kick.
Attachment of the Toe Kick.

 

The 24″ toe kick is connected at the front with pocket joint screws. Now, this toe kick is really only for reference since you may want to connect more than one cabinet together. When connecting several cabinets together a long toe kick will span all or some of the sections and will be attached with finishing nails, for instance. Seen in this graphic, the 24″ piece would leave a gap when slid up against another cabinet. So only take the above graphic as an example of a stand-alone item.

 

Back Panel.
Back Panel.

 

The back panel, 24″ x  31″, can be of any suitable material which should account for the function of the cabinet. If the cabinet might receive moisture, a water-resistant plywood could be used, for example. The thickness of the material should be between 1/8″ to 1/4″ depending on the material and use of the cabinet.

 

The Face Frame.
The Face Frame.

 

The face frame is made of 1 x 2 (3/4″ x 1-1/2″) material, with the uprights at 31″ and the horizontal pieces at 21-1/2″. The frame can be made of more expensive, denser materials since it will receive more wear and requires little. The frame should be glued and connected with pocket joints. However, as a tip, to keep the lengths even when inserting the pocket joint screws, clamp a piece across both connecting pieces to ensure that they do not move and become uneven. 

 

Placement of the Front Frame With 1/4" Overlap.
Placement of the Front Frame With 1/4″ Overlap.

 

In order that the cabinets appear even with each other, we give a 1/4″ overlap of the frame to make it easier to lay cabinets side by side. Otherwise, if there were unevenness, then gaps would be nearly impossible to hide.

 

Attaching the Front Frame to the Carcass.
Attaching the Front Frame to the Carcass.

 

The above graphic illustrates the use of pocket joints to connect the front frame. In this way, when cabinets are placed side by side the joints are not seen and not visible from the inside as well. However, the joints, depending on the view, may be placed on the inside, too. Remember that pocket joint holes can be covered with wooden plugs made for hiding them.

 

Front Frame Connection From the Other Side.
Front Frame Connection From the Other Side.

 

Next, we install the top cleats.

 

Top Cleats.
Top Cleats.

 

The top cleats are cut from the same 1 x 4 material used for the back supports and are also 22-1/2″. They are connected as seen in the graphic with pocket joints and glue.

 

The Shelf.
The Shelf.

 

The shelf may fit loose on a peg system or be permanently attached with pocket joints. A peg system uses pegs readily available at hardware stores that can be inserted along two lines of holes placed toward the front and back of each side of the interior of the cabinet. The allows the pegs to be moved and, of course, the shelf to be adjusted.

 

 

 

 

The Finished Basic Cabinet.
The Finished Basic Cabinet.

 

As was mentioned above, different configurations exist when it comes to putting a door on this cabinet. A future article will show various easy DIY doors that will work on the cabinet as well as putting in drawers using different methods. This is basically a reference work to show how one can easily build a cabinet in all sorts of sizes. Wall cabinets are essentially the same except they lack a toe kick and the top cleats are replaced with a solid piece. Also, they generally have only around a 12″ depth.

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

 

Pyramid House

The Pyramid House.
The Pyramid House.

 

The Pyramid House design was based upon a longstanding pleasure of basic geometric forms, the square and the isosceles triangle.  The house is a perfect square at 20′ x 20′ and, therefore, near 400 square feet after deducting the thickness of the walls. The corners sport triangular windows that give the feeling that the roof is balanced in the middle like a teeter-totter. The angles of the non-glass triangles harken back to the angle of the pyramids at Giza in Egypt.

Unfortunately, further consideration should be made regarding the support of the roof. It might be necessary to engineer a less fragile way to carry the weight of the roof such as vertical mullions as well as the horizontal ones or corner mullions perhaps on the inside of the glass to keep the sleek look of the corners from the outside. The weight of the roof is not that great considering the overall dimensions of the building. However, the roof is not supported on the inside by load bearing walls but spans the entire width and length of the space.


The Pyramid House With Surrounding Trellis and Gate Closed.
The Pyramid House With Surrounding Trellis and Gate Closed.

 

Pyramid House With Trellis Removed For a Clean Line of Sight.
Pyramid House With Trellis Removed For a Clean Line of Sight.

 

As you proceed through the images in this design article, you will notice the finishes and materials change. This is simply to illustrate the many choices available in the design of this house. 

 

Another View of the Front at a Slightly Different Angle.
Another View of the Front at a Slightly Different Angle.

 

With Different Materials.
With Different Materials.

 

The Southern Side of the House.
The Southern Side of the House.

 

A Direct View of the Southern Side of the House.
A Direct View of the Southern Side of the House.

 

The Back Southern Corner.
The Back Southern Corner. (With Stucco Walls.)

 

Direct View of the Back of the House.
Direct View of the Back of the House.

 

Due to the small size of this house, certain symmetries such as the placement of the back door to one side becomes necessary. If placed in the middle then the bed area on the inside would narrow.

 

Coming Around to the North Side of the House.
Coming Around to the North Side of the House.

 

The Privacy Trellis Removed.
The Privacy Trellis Removed.

 

The north side of the house features a built-in cement sink and stove top.

 

North Side of the House.
North Side of the House.

 

Coming Back Around to the Front.
Coming Back Around to the Front.

 

The outdoor chairs are of my design and can be seen on diymodernfuniture.com at E-Chair

 

The North Front Corner With the Trellis.
The North Front Corner With the Trellis.

 

The Front Gate.
The Front Gate.

 

On the Front Patio Looking North.
On the Front Patio Looking North. (The Front Door on the Right.)

 

 

On the Front Patio Looking South.
On the Front Patio Looking South.

 

The Patio Extension on the North Side of the House.
The Patio Extension on the North Side of the House.

 

View From the Front Door.
View From the Front Door.

 

The kitchen is on the immediate left while the bathroom is toward the back on the left. The sleeping area is on the right and out of view is the living area on the right.


Just Inside the Front Door Looking to the Left.
Just Inside the Front Door Looking to the Left.

 

We see a small kitchen with island bar with a small dining area in the windowed corner.

 

View From the Small Dining Area.
View From the Small Dining Area.

 

Seeing the Living Area From the Small Dining Area.
Seeing the Living Area From the Small Dining Area.

 

The Sleeping Area.
The Sleeping Area.

 

Looking From the Sleeping Area Toward the Kitchen/Dining Area.
Looking From the Sleeping Area Toward the Kitchen/Dining Area.

 

The Lounging Area and Front Door.
The Lounging Area and Front Door.

 

The Bathroom at the North Corner of the House.
The Bathroom at the North Corner of the House.

 

The bathroom is separated from the rest of the house by 8′ walls on two sides. The interior walls of this house are 12′. Therefore, the bathroom has no independent ceiling.

 

The Bathroom Sink With the Door to the Left.
The Bathroom Sink With the Door to the Left.

 

 

Peering Through the Bathroom Door to the Sleeping Area.
Peering Through the Bathroom Door to the Sleeping Area.

 

 

This square tiny house design utilizes high ceilings and an open floor plan to create a sense of spaciousness. The basic forms used allows for an almost unlimited combination of colors, textures, finishes, fixtures, and materials.

 

Pyramid House Floor Plan.
Pyramid House Floor Plan.




HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

 

Movable Cabinets

Movable Bathroom Sink and Cabinet.
Movable Bathroom Sink and Cabinet.

Why is cabinetry in the home expected to be built-in? When attending architecture school, I designed a rather inventive duplex where most everything was movable. This included the walls, the cabinets, the closets, and even a second story bedroom. Due to regularly placed pluggable drainage and snap on, snap off plumbing, sinks, bathtubs, and toilets could be moved. The walls were a steel mesh that allowed for hanging pictures and objects but a metal cleat system hung wall cabinets while kitchen cabinetry all sat on the floor as ordinary furniture with any backslash attached to the cabinets and not the wall without the need for special carpentry. One could change the entire floor plan. The number of bedrooms, bathrooms, or any room was only limited by the number of square feet of the structure. Since I still have the architectural drawings and plans for this duplex, perhaps I will include that in a future article because of the various space-saving ideas that would work in small or tiny houses.

One of the great ideas involved in the house mentioned above is the use of mechanisms to allow the movability of cabinets and storage. One such mechanism utilizes the French cleat.

The French cleat is a strong, simple wall attachment mainly known by those who run a workshop of some sort. Woodworkers, carpenters, auto shops, and all sorts of workers affix shelves and carpentry to walls making use of the French cleat.  Why it is not taken advantage of in the home more often is beyond me but it permits cabinetry movement and flexibility in arranging.

The other great thing about the French cleat is how simple and cheap they are to make for those into DIY. Simply take a 1 x 4 or a long section of plywood and cut in the center at a 45-degree angle and voila! Attaching one piece to the cabinet and another piece to the wall and one has a system.

 

French Cleat Cut.
French Cleat Cut.

 

French Cleat Cut and Separated.
French Cleat Cut and Separated.

 

Showing Articulation in the Proper Orientation.
Showing Articulation in the Proper Orientation.

 

Connected.
Connected.

 

Beginning Attachment.
Beginning Attachment.

 

The top part of the cleat will connect to the cabinet, while the bottom will connect to the wall.

 

Attached to Cabinet Showing Articulation.
Attached to Cabinet Showing Articulation.

 

I haven’t bothered trimming the cleat to the width of the cabinet simply because that would be unimportant to the illustration. Also, normally one would only need a cleat at the top of a cabinet with a leveling piece on the bottom. However, if the cabinet will hold a lot and/or heavy objects, two cleats will secure the cabinet even more.

 

Further Illustration of the Articulation.
Further Illustration of the Articulation.

 

Bottom Articulation.
Bottom Articulation.

 

Top Articulation.
Top Articulation.

 

Wooden French cleats are not the only strategy. Metal ones are readily available at hardware stores.

 

Metal French Cleat.
Metal French Cleat.

Metal French Cleat.
Metal French Cleat.

Metal French Cleat.
Metal French Cleat.

 

 

Cabinets are not the only thing to work with French cleats. Shelves or anything meant to mount on a wall can utilize the French Cleat.

 

Showing a Wooden Shelf Support.
Showing a Wooden Shelf Support.

 

 A French Cleat Shelf System.
A French Cleat Shelf System.

 

French Cleat Board.
French Cleat Board.

 

French Cleat Board.
French Cleat Board.

 

Now, as far as free-standing cabinets go, one can find them at IKEA and other modern furniture stores. As long as a cabinet is well-built, one meant to attach to a wall can be slightly modified and find a place on the floor not attached to a wall. Credenzas and sideboards will work as free-standing cabinets.

 

Kitchen Unit. (From a DIY Project of Mine.)
Kitchen Unit. (From a Credenza DIY Project of Mine.)

 

Sink and Cook-top. (From a Credenza DIY Project of Mine.)
Sink and Cook-top. (From a Credenza DIY Project of Mine.)

 

Sink!
Sink! (From a Credenza DIY Project of Mine.)

 

The following IKEA free-standing cabinets are used just as an example of what is available in many places.

 

Ikea Varde Kitchen Cabinet.
IKEA Varde Kitchen Cabinet.

IKEA Free Standing Kitchen Surfaces.
IKEA Free-Standing Kitchen Surfaces.

 

IKEA Varde Sink Cabinet.
IKEA Varde Sink Cabinet.

 

IKEA Varde Kitchen Storage Cabinet.
IKEA Varde Kitchen Storage Cabinet.

 

 

Stainless Steel Free Standing Sink.
Stainless Steel Free Standing Sink.

 

Unless for safety reasons, a cabinet does not need to be attached to a wall and made a permanent fixture. For a small dwelling, the ability to move appliances, as well as cabinetry, gives an invaluable flexibility to account for changing needs and spaces. Sometimes, the best places to look for such things includes restaurant and office supply companies that aren’t wrapped up in conventional notions of what residential cabinetry is all about.

 

 

 

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

Building a Container House

I thought I might write an article on the methods and procedures for building houses from shipping containers. I live in a city where a large project of condominiums utilizing shipper containers was quite successful and inspiring. Nevertheless, I can not compete with some of the information available on the Internet and so have decided to provide some useful links that one might explore how to build them as well as the various configurations and design ideas.

Now, I do not like to use too many links because they tend to disappear over time. However, I will make an exception this time and hope that you, the reader, will be helpful and let me know when they no longer work.

 

Tin Can Cabin.
Tin Can Cabin.

 

First of all, one of the best explanations of the various things needed for construction of a container house comes from Tin Can Cabin. This website covers many of the basic details of putting containers together and offers excellent advice on safety. There are aspects to the proper outfitting of a container home that might not be readily apparent. Yet this site covers them.

 

 

 

Container Home Plans.
Container Home Plans.

 

Another essential article to read is “5 Mistakes to Avoid When Building a Shipping Container Home.” This covers the necessity of checking local building codes as well as something I have read over and over again; that of the removal of too much structural steel. When designing a container house, as part of the design, one must include strategies for reinforcing large areas removed for doors and windows or when removing an entire side to affix to another container, for instance. As a general rule, easy designing is hard constructing.

 

 

 

Architecture Daily.
Architecture Daily.

 

 

An excellent article on one of my favorite publications, Architecture Daily, is “11 Tips You Need To Know Before Building A Shipping Container Home. ”

 

 

 

Markasaurus
Markasaurus.

 

Even though quite negative, this article, “What’s Wrong With Shipping Container Housing? Everything”, and considering this article mainly refers to mass housing, provides some insight into things to consider. One thing in the article, though, not accurate is the dimensions of a shipping container. Some shipping containers are higher than those mentioned, although the width is the same. The width is not necessarily restricted depending on the design.

 

 

 

Popular Mechanics.
Popular Mechanics.

 

On Popular Mechanics’ website appears an article on 45 shipping container buildings, many of the tiny house variety.

 

 

Image result for container homes

 

Residential Shipping Container Primer.
Residential Shipping Container Primer.

 

Another excellent list of what one needs to do to build a container home is on Residential Shipping Container Primer. This post covers subjects such as structural integrity, foundations, and permitting, for instance.

 

The Ultimate Guide to Shipping Container Homes.
The Ultimate Guide to Shipping Container Homes.

 

The above link purports to be the ultimate guide to shipping container homes on the website, Home TuneUp.

 

And, of course, a couple of videos will help, as well:

 

 

 

 

Container Homes On HGTV.
Container Homes On HGTV.

 

This is a link to some videos on container homes on HGTV.

 

Article On Web Urbanist.
Article On Web Urbanist.

 

This link leads to a site that contains 10 films on the construction of container homes. 

 

Obviously, many find a fascination with the many designs coming from the use of shipping containers. Yet there are pros and cons in utilizing them. Hopefully, this article provides a starting point for information in pursuing such an unusual building.

 

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.

Chicken, Cheese, and Vegetables.

This is the first in a series of recipes for small spaces. These recipes will feature the use of few kitchen tools, pots, and pans. Especially considered will be the occupation of space by ingredients. Also, aesthetics will factor in the recipes.

If you have a recipe that fits with the scheme of cooking in small spaces, please feel free to let us know at howard@midcenturymoderngroovy.com.

 


Chicken, Vegetables, and Cheese in a Crust

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  • Take a bag of frozen stir-fry or your favorite mixed vegetables, from 12 oz to 1 lb and saute them in a small amount of oil.
  • Season with salt, pepper, garlic, onion, a little paprika, and oregano.
  • Cook them until they are still a little crisp and then pour them into a deep dish pie crust.
  • Add from 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 cups pulled or shredded chicken. You can use a large can of chicken. (You can make this crustless in a casserole dish.)
  • Cover with a generous amount of your favorite cheese (2 cups shredded), and as an option, sliced black olives.
  • Cook at 325 degrees until the crust and edges are a nice brown. Serve while hot.

If you want side dishes, try hash browns or rice. This is simple, veggies, chicken, and cheese in a crust. Delicious!

You can also use sausage instead of chicken or sausage and chicken.

 

Designing Modernist

Through all the “ism” in art and architecture, modernist design in architecture refers to the mid-century of the 20th century. So many buildings and residences set the stage for contemporary modern designs. Many of the iconic places so familiar to us have exerted incredible influences on current design to such a degree, that the postmodernist reaction has been to take its elements and add complexity and elaboration similar to the Baroque and Rococo changes from the Renaissance.  In terms of modern style, modernist design suits small and tiny houses much more so than the flamboyance of the contemporary due to the emphasis on what I call direct design; that is, avoidance of unnecessary complications and details.

 

Glass House, Philip Johnson, 1949.
Glass House, Philip Johnson, 1949. By Staib – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7797606

 

Of that stated above, not all is entirely true. Due to the fact that the modernist impulse leads to experimentation and groundbreaking designs, not all modernist fabrications strictly adhered to the International Style such as in the design of the Glass House or the Farnsworth House.

 

Farnsworth House, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1945-51.
Farnsworth House, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1945-51.

 

Significantly different to the Internationalists, Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs clearly differ to the more rectilinear edifices of the Internationalists such as Mies van der Rohe’s creations.

 

David and Gladys Wright House, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1952.
David and Gladys Wright House, Phoenix, Arizona, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1952.

 

Since this is not a scholarly examination of all the types and elements of all modern architecture, for our purposes we will stick to some of the elements of the International Style.

One always hears or reads the phrase, “…clean lines…” I prefer unadorned or unbroken lines. Modernists seek to find elemental geometry in their vision of the residences they build. The cube, the circle, the triangle becomes their palette. The most important and well-known houses built by modernists possess a Zen-like quality when combined with their surrounding environment.

 

The Bailey House or Case Study House #21, Los Angeles, California, Pierre Koenig, 1958.
The Bailey House or Case Study House #21, Los Angeles, California, Pierre Koenig, 1958.

 

Case Study House #22, The Stahl House, Los Angeles, California, Pierre Koenig, 1959.
Case Study House #22, The Stahl House, Los Angeles, California, Pierre Koenig, 1959.

 

This brings us to the first modernist element. The house should create an atmosphere when combined with its surrounding landscape. This means that those inside feel the influence of the outside landscape through walls of glass, sliding glass doors, large windows, even walls that move to allow access to patios or verandas. Any room might be exposed in some way to views or have access to the outdoors.

 

Mid Century Modern House, Berkeley, California, Roger Lee, 1952.
Mid Century Modern House, Berkeley, California, Roger Lee, 1952.

 

The Hailey Residence, Richard Neutra - bedroom
The Hailey Residence (Bedroom), Los Angeles, California, Richard Neutra, 1959.

 

Many times, where there are no windows or glass walls, modernist architects used clerestory windows and skylights to bring in natural light.

 

The Hailey Residence, Richard Neutra - front
The Hailey Residence, Los Angeles, California, Richard Neutra, 1959. (Notice the clerestory windows all along the top just below the roof.)

 

This brings us to another important element of modern residences. Often times the walls of glass and sliding glass doors were on the sides of the house not facing the street. When, indeed, the front facing the street had considerable glass, screens of sculpted cement block, wood or metal blocked a direct view.

 

Twin Palms, Palm Springs, California, William Krisel, 1957.
Twin Palms, Palm Springs, California, William Krisel, 1957.

 

 

Whittier Public Library, Whittier, California, William Harrison, 1959.
Whittier Public Library, Whittier, California, William Harrison, 1959.

 

Rather than walls, screens were also used for spatial arrangements in the interior as well.

 

Knoll Showroom, Mexico City, Erwin Hauer, 1961.
Knoll Showroom, Mexico City, Erwin Hauer, 1961.

 

Probably the most noticeable and prevalent feature of a modernist, post and lintel dwelling is the exposed skeletal structure. Large beams supporting the roof are left to be admired.

 

Curtis House, New Orleans, Louisiana, John Dinwiddie, 1955.
Curtis House, New Orleans, Louisiana, John Dinwiddie, 1955.

 

Proudly exposing the structure of a building was thought of as an asset, many times, and not to be bashful about. This notion carries over from commercial buildings and high-rises such as the Seagram Building in New York.

 

Seagram Building, New York, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson, 1958.
Seagram Building, New York, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson, 1958.

 

Of course, when dealing with the International Style modernists, they reveled in using steel for the framework of a residence. This didn’t always carry over from commercial to residential. Besides the more famous structures, most modern houses are framed in wood, especially those made in a modern American Style. At any rate, the readily visible frame claimed a poetic beauty among modern houses.

 

Case Study House #8, Pacific Palisades, California, Charles and Ray Eames, 1949.
Case Study House #8, Pacific Palisades, California, Charles and Ray Eames, 1949.

 

Not all modernist houses in the International Style sported flat roofs. Butterfly, saw-tooth, shed and other unique shapes, such as the hyperbolic parabolic figure into modernist designs.

 

Mid-Century Modern House With Hyperbolic parabolic Roof, New Canaan, Connecticut, by James Evans.
Mid-Century Modern House With Hyperbolic parabolic Roof, New Canaan, Connecticut, by James Evans.

 

An Example of Butterfly Roof On Mid-Century Modern Home.
An Example of Butterfly Roof On Mid-Century Modern Home.

 

Decorative elements became frowned upon in the International Style. However, simple sculptural elements, especially those which supported or supplied a function found their way into their architectural palette. Included among these decorative elements, designers created walls of natural stone or wood that continued from the inside to the outside, repeated arches and columns and simple porticoes or decks that continued and accented the rectilinear quality of the form of the rest of the house.

 

Hooper House, Baltimore, Maryland, Marcel Breuer, 1959.
Hooper House, Baltimore, Maryland, Marcel Breuer, 1959.

 

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington District of Columbia, Edward Durell Stone, 1971.
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington District of Columbia, Edward Durell Stone, 1971.

 

Although the above example of repeated columns is not a family residence, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts provides an excellent illustration of how a simple element presents an appealing architectural feature.

Since we have examined basic elements of modernist design of residences, we can create a small house utilizing what we know. Fortunately, Modern Tiny House already has translations of modernist houses from previous articles. See: A Mies van der Rohe Tiny House? and Eames Case Study House #8 Goes Tiny: Complete Addition

 

A Tiny House Version of the Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe.
A Tiny House Version of the Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe, the Glass House by Philip Johnson, and Case Study House #8 by Charles and Ray Eames.

 

However, a second article will forward the basic ideas of design and, then, digitally build a modernist tiny house inculcating many of the elements above. Possibly, sometime in the future we will venture a try at tiny, modern organic houses utilizing the elements such as those used by Bruce Goff or Frank Lloyd Wright.

 

Tiny House Version of Case Study House #8 by Charles and Ray Eames.
Tiny House Version of Case Study House #8 by Charles and Ray Eames.

 

HBosler

Self-Portrait in Red.
Self-Portrait in Red.