All posts by Howard Bosler

Eames Case Study House #8 Goes Tiny: Complete Addition

The previous tiny house based on the Eames House only included the main building and did not feature the studio, courtyard, and walkway. This design does. As was previously mentioned, a loft would be part of this design. The loft, however, is not in the main building, but in the studio and could function as a living/sleeping area with a pullout sofa. This is where we will start in the loft area.

Eames Tiny House With Studio
Eames Tiny House With Studio–Loft Area



Eames Tiny House With Studio
Eames Tiny House With Studio–Showing Ladder/Desk.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
Eames Tiny House With Studio–Ladder/Desk

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
Eames Tiny House With Studio–Showing an easel and painting area with a Le Corbusier chair and Mondrian painting in the background.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
A view from the outside of the studio.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
The ladder, which acts also as part of a desk, is shown with a peek at the courtyard.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
Looking into the studio from the courtyard.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
A view of the courtyard and the back of the main building from the studio.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
Main building, courtyard, and studio going from left to right.



Eames Tiny House With Studio
A more comprehensive view.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
A more graphical, less rendered view of the studio.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
A bit closer.

 

Eames Tiny House With Studio
Showing both buildings in a simpler, more graphical view.

 

The main building is 287 sq. ft. Whereas, the studio is 147 sq. ft. Altogether, the interior space is less than 500 sq. ft. The most noticeable thing about the studio is its’ spaciousness, even though it is so much smaller than the main building.

At any rate, here is my version of the Eames House in tiny form. I enjoyed doing the design and look forward to taking on Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Waters in tiny form.



HBosler

Self-Portrait in Yellow Chair
Self-Portrait in Yellow Chair

Eames Case Study House #8 Goes Tiny

I have done a reduction or tiny house variation of a Philip Johnson and a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Now I have designed a tiny house based upon the Eames Case Study House #8. One of my favorite case study houses, the Eames House is International in style, while not as severe as some of the iconic houses of the Internationalists.

Eames Case Study House showing the side overhang. The wall retains the hill on the other side.
Eames Case Study House showing the side overhang. The wall retains the hill on the other side.

The history of the Case Study House Program can be found by clicking this link. No sense repeating what has been described in other articles.



The Eames House is located in California at Pacific Palisades. The significance of this house comes from the fact that the house was designed by Ray and Charles Eames as a personal residence and constructed in 1949. A house that the architect will live in, generally displays in detail the tastes and desires of the designer, as in contrast to the possible compromises made in building for others.

This residence has two floors and two buildings. One is the main building and the other is studio space. Avant-garde for the time, the rectilinear, window clad walls features areas of primary colors and white and black that gives the feel of a Mondrian painting. The windows, however, are broken up visually, not only by the solid, rectangular areas but by a large number of mullions framing the glass. Essentially, the complex is composed of two rectilinear buildings, with the main building about 2 times the size of the smaller studio building and stretched along the same axis. The structures were built with off-the-shelf parts.

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By looking at the floor plan, one can see the balance in the design. If one includes the courtyard with the studio, the space taken is about the size of the main building. The layout avoids complexity with unnecessary rooms that one finds in many residences these days. This house also makes a statement about living and work by actually physically separating the spaces, yet retaining the orientation of the two buildings and attaching the two with walkways and courtyard.

The original design of this house was concocted by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen and proposed an elaborate, raised cantilevered form that projected over the drive and front yard. Fortunately, Charles and Ray Eames got together, after spending times among the lush landscape, and created a design less demanding on the environment, replacing the very dramatic with a solemnity and cooperation with nature.

This house was so successful that the Charles and Ray Eames lived there the rest of their lives.

The Studio
The Studio

Studio
Studio
Studio Interior
Studio Interior

The Tiny House Version:

The tiny house version seeks to keep the outward appearance of the Eames House while adding a few additional features fundamental to the new design. Of course, the changes made could be applied to a larger footprint and present exciting design variations. This tiny house is only 287 sq. ft.

NOTE: In this particular presentation, the walk-ways, courtyard, and studio have not been taken into account. A more elaborate version including these things plus a bedroom loft will be posted soon. Obviously, a tiny house including these extra features will consist of a larger footprint.

Side Portico at night.
Side Portico at night.

The side overhang acts a portico and, since there are doors all around the structure, acts as a front entrance, even though this is a side of the Eames House.

Same image with full sunlight.
Same image with full sunlight.

I used a stone wall instead of the manufactured look of cement blocks. This adds a more organic feel to a wall, here, that does not hold back earth and continues the warmth of the wood-paneled wall interior.

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The image here shows the direct take on the Eames House design, with a slight change to the corner post as a cylindrical support.

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Coming around to the side we notice the use of primary colors. However, instead of the smaller, colored inserts, I have used large panels, relatively speaking, and the color red is represented by a tinted window. Red tinted glass also has a dramatic effect on the interior, flooding areas with color during the day and creating geometric displays on interior walls and objects. This is a major design feature of this tiny house and one I have not seen before in tiny house construction.

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The glass to the right is tinted blue and yellow and the white panels seen on the Eames House are included.

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The house at night showing the red, blue and yellow tinted windows.

Interior view immediately inside the portico.
Interior view immediately inside the portico.

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Looking from the direction of the modular kitchen. The sofa is a Grand Confort sofa by Le Corbusier. The blue chair is an Eames chair, of course.

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Looking from the sofa. (Notice the Wassily Chair to the left out on the portico.)

Viewing the hall.
Viewing the hall.

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Seeing the vaulted ceiling. Notice that the internal walls are partitions and do not meet the ceiling.

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Another view looking up. The wood structure to the left is a storage cabinet that also satisfies as a partition. The bedroom is behind this cabinet. The wall further down is not aligned to the cabinet and hides the bathroom area.

Peeking between the two cabinets.
Peeking between the two cabinets.
Inside the bedroom with its’ Barcelona Chair by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.
Inside the bedroom with its’ Barcelona Chair by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.
View from the bed’s headboard.
View from the bed’s headboard.
The attendant bathroom area with a shower cabinet next to the yellow tinted window.
The attendant bathroom area with a shower cabinet next to the yellow tinted window.

This tiny house design invokes all sorts of design ideas and spurs some creative juices. Perhaps more designs will come after the larger, more elaborate version is done.



HBosler

self-in-chair.jpg
Self-Portrait in Yellow Chair

Theodore’s Tiny House

This tiny house design is only 240 sq. ft. The concept of this house without a loft is the utilization of a pullout sofa for sleeping. The floor plan is rather simple with two rectangles, one serving as a bath and the remaining area the living and kitchen areas. Dining is done on the patio or a folding table inside.

Theodore's-tiny-house-floor-plan
Theodore’s-tiny-house-floor-plan
Theodore's Tiny House
The side of Theodore’s tiny house showing the living room window.
Theodore's Tiny House
Direct view of the large window to the living room/kitchen.
Theodore's Tiny House
Coming around to the entrance to the tiny house.
Theodore's Tiny House
Direct view of the patio and entrance. I should mention that the chair models were designed by me and exist in the real world except I use them as dinning chairs.
Theodore's Tiny House
Another view of the patio.
Theodore's Tiny House
Further around to the side.
Theodore's Tiny House
Side of tiny house.
Theodore's Tiny House
Moving to the back of the house, facing the exterior walls of the bathroom.
Theodore's Tiny House
The same view, but during the day.
Theodore's Tiny House
Facing the exterior wall of the kitchen.
Theodore's Tiny House
Looking from the patio into the living/kitchen area.
Theodore's Tiny House
Kitchen area.
Theodore's Tiny House
Living area.
Theodore's Tiny House
Media center or possibly storage area or both. Also showing door to bathroom.
Theodore's Tiny House
In the bathroom.
Theodore's Tiny House
In the bathroom pointed at storage cabinet for clothes and shoes.
Theodore's Tiny House
Vanity in bathroom.

Due to the wall on the side that extends past the house on each side and forms part of the front entrance and patio, the house will have an appearance of a much substantial dwelling. The overhanging roof provides a visually interesting form as one travels around the small house.

HBosler

self-portrait-in-red
Self-Portrait

Davie’s Tiny House

This is a house who basic plan forms a T with different elevations for each section. The length that crosses the T shares the kitchen and living room and the dangling part of the T, the bedroom and bath. Clerestory windows above the the taller bedroom and bath section provide an abundance of light and feeling of a greater space. Actually, this space could be redesigned as a loft or for additional storage. The living room and kitchen is also flooded in light with large picture windows. Both the kitchen and the bedroom have access to the side patio.

Davies Tiny House Floor Plan
Davies Tiny House Floor Plan
Davies Tiny House
The front of the house.
Davies Tiny House
Direct view of the front of the house showing the taller, perpendicular section.
Davies Tiny House
South corner of the house.
Davies Tiny House
Further along to the side of the house.
Davies Tiny House
Direct view of the south side of the house.
Davies Tiny House
Showing the meshing of the bedroom/bath and the kitchen/living room sections.
Davies Tiny House
The back of the house head on.
Davies Tiny House
View of the patio with the doors to the kitchen (yellow section) and the bedroom (dark gray section).
Davies Tiny House
Another look at the patio.
Davies Tiny House
Picture of the north side of the house.
Davies Tiny House
Back around to the front where the kitchen is on the left and the living room is on the right.
Davies Tiny House
Inside the kitchen, looking at the door to the patio.
Davies Tiny House
Kitchen cabinets.
Davies Tiny House
Window in the kitchen that looks out upon the front lawn.
Davies Tiny House
Looking from the kitchen, down the hall to the living room with the door on the right to the front lawn and the door on the left to the bedroom.
Davies Tiny House
The living room.
Davies Tiny House
Inside the bedroom, pointed toward the door to the patio. The door to the bath, if it could be seen, would be to the right.
Davies Tiny House
Bedroom. The door to the hall is to the right and the door to the bath is on the left.
Davies Tiny House
Showing the toilet and shower cabinet in the bathroom.
Davies Tiny House
The vanity in the bathroom with the door to the bedroom on the left.

Davie’s tiny house uses vertical space to provide the feel of much greater volume. This house is only 269 interior square feet. Multiple elevations of the roof with its’ generous overhang, provides an impressive architectural view of this tiny house.

HBosler

self-portrait-in-red
Self-Portrait

Harlow’s Tiny House

Harlow’s tiny house is another plan based upon the a square foundation, also with a flat roof. As with the other designs so far, this one relies to a great extent on the outdoors to provide significant space and activity areas.

Harlow's Tiny House Floor Plan
Harlow’s Tiny House Floor Plan
Harlow's tiny house
Harlow’s tiny house without the roof structure.
Harlow's tiny house
Harlow’s tiny house showing front entrance.
Harlow's tiny house
Harlow’s tiny house looking more to side of house of bedroom and bath.
Harlow's tiny house
Looking directly at the side of the house with the bedroom on the left and bathroom on the right.
Harlow's tiny house
Corner of the house showing uncovered seating area.
Harlow's tiny house
Beginning to see the covered patio off of the kitchen.
Harlow's tiny house
Aerial view of back patios.
Harlow's tiny house
Direct view of back of house.
Harlow's tiny house
Corner view of patio off the kitchen and the side of the house.
Harlow's tiny house
Direct view of side of the house.
Harlow's tiny house
Coming back around to the front.
Harlow's tiny house
Back to the front.
Harlow's tiny house
Peeking through the front folding doors into the living room and seeing the kitchen in the distance.
Harlow's tiny house
Looking back to the front folding doors from the kitchen.
Harlow's tiny house
View of the front from the kitchen at a different angle.
Harlow's tiny house
Full view of the kitchen. The doors to the bathroom and the bedroom would be seen to the right.
Harlow's tiny house
Kitchen view showing the bedroom (closest), bathroom, and exit to patio doors.
Harlow's tiny house
Bedroom view.
Harlow's tiny house
Bedroom view looking back to door.
Harlow's tiny house
Harlow’s tiny house bathroom.
Harlow's tiny house
Another view of the front corner.

Please excuse any anomalies with these 3D rendered images. My time is limited and when I can I will try and go back and fix them. Even with the high powered computers today, the rendering does take quite a while.

Even though this house looks spacious, this house is only around 370 square feet. Of course, with the addition of the outdoor areas, the house would be quite comfortable.

HBosler

self-portrait-in-red
Self-Portrait

A Mies van der Rohe Tiny House?

I have always thought that for modern tiny house design a good place to start is looking at the famous, incredible works of the mid-century masters. Even though one may pay a fortune for a Philip Johnson or a Mies van der Rohe designed home today, the use of post and lintel framing, simple open designs, little to no extraneous decoration, makes for an inexpensive construction.

Andy Warhol and Philip Johnson´s Glass House. The Glass House or Johnson House, built in 1949 in New Canaan, Connecticut, was designed by Philip Johnson as his own residence.

 

 

 

 

We can see the simplicity of the design of the Glass House by Philip Johnson. The unique feature of this house is the circular form seen on the right of the above picture that functions as a bathroom on one side and a fireplace on the other. This house scales easily into a tiny aspect:

 

 

Metal posts are not necessarily essential. A tiny house with so few supports is possible with wood since the small, flat roof does not require extensive bracing. Here is a tiny house model of a retake of the Glass House:

Philip Johnson Tiny House Floor Plan
Philip Johnson Tiny House Floor Plan
Tiny version of Philip Johnson's Glass House
Tiny version of Philip Johnson’s Glass House

With this house, standard windows and doors could be utilized as long as they fit the overall artistic aesthetic. Since the plan is entirely open, very little detailed carpentry is necessary. A lot of flexibility exists with the foundation as well. The house could sit on a platform above the ground and retain the mid-century modern adherence to the International Style. The total square footage of this tiny “Glass House” is only 224.

 

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Back of the house showing the bedroom on the left and the kitchen on the right with the bathroom in the middle.

 

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Looking in the direction of the kitchen and dining area.

 

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Kitchen and dining area.

 

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At the corner with the front of the dwelling.

 

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The front of the house with the kitchen on the left and the bedroom on the right.

 

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The corner of the house exposing the bedroom.

 

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View directly into the bedroom.

 

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A view of the back of the house.

 

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An aerial view.

 

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A view of the house at night.

 

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Looking into the house with the roof off.

 

Now let’s look at Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s the Farnsworth House.

 

Farnsworth House, Plano, Illinois, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1951
Farnsworth House, Plano, Illinois, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1951

This International Style house shares a similarity with the Glass House in that an open space surrounds a core.

 

Handmade floor plan drawing of Farnsworth House by Mies Van der Rohe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A model showing the core bathrooms and kitchen.

 

 

Here is an example of translating Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House into a tiny version of 279 square feet:

Mies van der Rohe Tiny House Floor Plan
Mies van der Rohe Tiny House Floor Plan

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This is a side view without the addition of the flat roof.

 

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A side view with a bar area on the left and the living area on the right.

 

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A side view at night.

 

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An oblique view showing the center media and storage wall.

 

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The end of the building with a view of the bathroom with the light off.

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Corner view of the bathroom.

 

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The other side view showing the kitchen with the bathroom on the left and the dining area on the right.

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Angled view with a look at the kitchen.

 

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Looking directly through the house from the front porch.

 

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Back again to the side view.

 

 

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Interior view of bar area.

 

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Kitchen view.

 

 

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Looking through the living room.

 

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Looking through the living room from the opposite direction.

 

 

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The dining area.

 

Here we have taken two famous, modern buildings and translated them to tiny versions. Many more can be done. Some maybe very tough to shrink to tiny, such as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water. Yet we have only just begun. Due to the lengthy nature of this first attempt, the next effort will have to wait when we can take another couple of famous buildings and reduce them to a useable tiny home.

HBosler

 

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18 midcentury modern vacation homes – including a “Homarina” and a Japanese-style tea house – Retro Renovation

via 18 midcentury modern vacation homes – including a “Homarina” and a Japanese-style tea house – Retro Renovation.

Here is a treat for you! If you appreciate Mid Century Modern and tiny homes, this article features renderings of this very design subject. The tiny house movement today does not exclusively own the idea. Not far from where I live, a tiny house village exists that is Mid Century Modern with about a dozen cabanas. Although I have not been inside one, I would estimate they are about 300 to 400 square feet with the mid century high corner windows and the glass blocks. I think an article is in order in the near future. Enjoy the above link. I certainly did!

Vacation home for boaters
Vacation home for boaters