Julie’s Tiny House Design

Julie’s tiny house is, as with other recent designs, based upon the square. In fact, the house is composed of 8’ x 8’ squares. This leads to the idea of modularization, where the components of the structure are built elsewhere and then delivered later to the construction area. The vaulted area over the dining area is meant purely to open the central space up, while providing architectural decoration.

Julie's Tiny House Floor Plan
Julie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

 

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We start at the back of the house, looking through the large bedroom window with a covered patio to the left and accessible from the bedroom. The exterior lights are off except for the overhead patio light.

 

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Lights on!

 

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Lights on at sunset.

 

Julie's House Design 4.pngWe’re headed around the side toward the front.

 

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The side of the house with the front entry and porch to the right.

 

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The front entrance.

 

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The front of the house. The floor of this house is a highly polished stone and the reason for the high reflectivity.

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The front of the house almost straight on showing another corner patio. The wall directly facing us is the kitchen.

Julie's House Design 9.pngHere we see a window to the kitchen overlooking a little covered patio with a planter.

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Proceeding to the other side of the house with a view of the windows to the bathroom and a slight look at the patio off the bedroom.

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A direct side view with the window to the kitchen on the left and the bedroom patio doors on the right. The bathroom is, of course, seen through the two windows in the center.

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The bedroom patio.

 

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We return to a side view with the large window to the bedroom.

 

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A view of the corner that has no patio.

 

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At the front entrance, looking up into the round window to the vaulted area.

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We’ve entered the front door and see the living area. To the right is the dining area and we can get a peek at the bedroom through the glass door.

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Looking through the living area into the dining area, seeing the glass door to the bathroom, with the kitchen to the right.

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The dining area and the kitchen beyond.

 

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Looking back towards the living area and the front entrance.

 

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In the bathroom with a look through the glass door on the right into the kitchen.

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On the opposite side of the bathroom with a peek out of the glass door into the dining area.

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A view of the bedroom while to the left through the glass door is a view of the front entrance and living area.

Julie's House Design 24.pngAcross the bedroom seeing the patio doors with the door to the dining and living areas to the right.

Julie's House Design 25.pngLooking inside the square, vaulted area above the dining area with the large round windows.

Julie's House Design 26.pngExternal view of the vaulted area. The roof could also be made into an elevated deck.

You may have noticed a classical feature of this house is that it is based upon a Greek cross, much like some cathedrals. Although the round windows could be replaced with square ones, the intriguing juxtaposition of perfect square to perfect round would be lost. You may also have noticed that the warm colors of green and yellow orange on the outside, contrast with the cool colors of the inside, although other color schemes might work with this house built upon the cube.

HBosler

 

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Howie’s Tiny House

This tiny house is simply a rectangle, but it shows what can be done with such a simple geometric structure. The fortunate thing about a simple rectangle is that it is the least expensive. As for the lack of an elevated support, I live in a desert environment and tend to think in those terms. Here, many houses are built on slabs without any thought to a basement, or an attic for that matter. Also, a flat roof has no possibility of collapse due to snow. In future, designs may include at least shed roofs, with the occasional gabled roof along the lines of American Mid-Century Modern.

Howie's Tiny House Floor Plan
Howie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

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The long patio at night, looking through the foliage.

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The long patio at night.

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The long patio in the afternoon.

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The long patio during the afternoon, looking toward the front of the house.

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Looking directly at the long patio in the afternoon.

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The long patio at night, looking at the front corner of the house.

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Corner of house at noon.

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Front of the house during the afternoon.

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Front at noon.

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Front corner of house in the afternoon.

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Side of house mid-morning.

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Backside of house mid-morning.

Tiny House 1 - 9-1-14 7-40-14 PM.pngHouse with roof off to give orientation.

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Looking at couch and front door.

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Looking at living area.

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Another living area view.

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Looking at storage closet facing bathroom entrance with living area and kitchen on either side.

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View of kitchen, looking toward bedroom.

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Kitchen and dining area with the bathroom entrance to the left.

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Dining area with the front door to the right.

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Looking back toward the living room

Tiny House 9.pngBathroom.

 

Tiny House 10.pngBathroom and bedroom view.

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Bedroom, fish eyed for context.

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Turning toward the front door.

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On the bed, looking to the back patio door.

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Looking out the patio door.

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Turned back around to look at the bedroom.

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Looking through the patio door into the bedroom.

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A final look with the roof off.

Although this house looks ample in size, the indoor square footage is only 239. The outdoors is used as a major extension to the roominess of the overall design. In fact, in such a house, in the right environment, the temptation would be to spend considerable hours outside.

HBosler

http://ultramoderntinyhouse.wordpress.com

 

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This Site Is For Those Of Us That Go Modern All The Way

I’ve always thought that shabby-chic is basically shabby with no chic, that rustic is unfinished, and country is an outhouse. Only modern and preferably ultra-modern here.

This site will present various posts about actual modern tiny homes, but will also include designs and ideas. Besides enjoying designing furniture, I enjoy designing tiny houses. I used to use the old architectural method of media on paper. However, these days digital methods occupy a lot of my time.

At any rate, nothing is formal here and will be presented as time and inclination dictates. As a side note, I generally give designs names of individuals as a personable way of remembering them.

Ronnie's Tiny House 13
Ronnie’s Tiny House 13

Ronnie’s Tiny House by Popular Demand

This article is originally from http://www.midcenturymoderngroovy.com.

I keep getting requests for my tiny house designs. Since architecture is art, and even though the subject of tiny houses is not the primary purpose of this website, the houses I design are always modern with a wink at Mid Century Modern. Even so, modern tiny houses are groovy!

Ronnie's Tiny House Floor Plan
Ronnie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance

Much like Andrea’s Tiny House, this house is based on the square, in this case two overlapping squares. (Again, I live in a desert environment where houses are built on slabs, so I haven’t included a raised foundation.) Aesthetically, as with Andrea’s, circular windows contrasts with the rectilinear forms. To follow the circular windows around the structure, the door repeats this motif. The following images are day views.

Ronnie’s Tiny House Front
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front

One gets the full effect of the circles and squares from a front view.

Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio and Back
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio and Back
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Opposite Side from Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Opposite Side from Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Near Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Near Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Later in Evening
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Later in Evening
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View, Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View, Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night, Lights off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night, Lights off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back and Side View at Night Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back and Side View at Night Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Patio View at Early Evening Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Patio View at Early Evening Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio View at Dusk Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio View at Dusk Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Corner View at Dusk Just Street Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Corner View at Dusk Just Street Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front View Straight On at Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front View Straight On at Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance

 

Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area

Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area

Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking at Patio Doors
Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking at Patio Doors
Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking Toward Bathroom Door and Way Toward Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking Toward Bathroom Door and Way Toward Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Toward Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Toward Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Through Patio Doors Onto Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Through Patio Doors Onto Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Bathroom
Ronnie’s Tiny House Bathroom
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Into Bathroom and at the Door to the Living Area
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Into Bathroom and at the Door to the Living Area
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into Dining Area with Door to Bathroom on the Right
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into Dining Area with Door to Bathroom on the Right
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Toward the Door to the Patio and the Door to the Bathroom on the Left
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Toward the Door to the Patio and the Door to the Bathroom on the Left
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into the Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into the Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking From the Kitchen into the Dining Area
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking From the Kitchen into the Dining Area

Admittedly, the kitchen is rather tight and would benefit from the exterior wall in the direction of the front being pushed out a couple of feet. However, this design would still work if the appliances and cabinets were on a smaller scale. This house is around 300 square feet and I will append a floor plan as soon as available. As a hint to orientation, follow the windows. The house is made of two squares where the corners of the squares overlap and form a square that makes the bathroom. One goes through a door in the living area into the bathroom and then another door that leads to the laundry/dining/kitchen area.

I have other very modern designs and will post those at regular intervals.

HBosler

http://www.midcenturymoderngroovy.com

 

Self-Portrati
Self-Portrati

 

Tiny House, Andrea’s (Due to Popular Demand)

Tiny House, Andrea’s

Due to many requests after viewing Tiny House, Miley’s, I am presenting a different design, also based on the square. More in line with the International style, this model is rectilinear with large round windows. It could easily be adapted to large areas of glass rather than expanses of painted walls and like Miley’s, this house begs for color instead of the contemporary penchant for neutrals.

Andrea's Tiny House Floor Plan
Andrea’s Tiny House Floor Plan

 

Front of Tiny House, Andrea’s.
Front of Tiny House, Andrea’s.

Andrea’s makes a simple architectural statement. The square and triangular forms of the edifice is broken up by two large circular windows in the front. These windows provide interest to what might appear rather boring if standard rectangular windows were used. The adaptable appearance would allow for walls of glass, if properly done. Yet added decoration would hamper the cleanliness of the composition.

Side view looking north.
Side view looking north.

This view gives a better look at the rise of the building from back to front. A shed roof with overhang would not be out of place. Even so, a flat roof accentuates the severity of the geometric plan.

View looking east, toward the back of the building.
View looking east, toward the back of the building.

The back of the house is dominated by wide, French doors that lead onto a patio. A better view of the slanted roof comes into sight.

A closer view of the back.
A closer view of the back.
Daytime view.
Daytime view.
Daytime.
Daytime.
Close up, daytime.
Close up, daytime.
Backyard, daytime.
Backyard, daytime.
Andrea’s with the roof off.
Andrea’s with the roof off.
The living room looking toward the front door.
The living room looking toward the front door.

Notice how the high ceiling at this end creates an illusion of a much larger volume. The large stretch of wall, broken up by the sizeable, round windows, also increases the effect of greater space. In this small house the living area acts also as the sleeping area with a daybed or a pull-out sofa.

To the left, a view of the dining and kitchen area.
To the left, a view of the dining and kitchen area.
Dining and living room view.
Dining and living room view.
A living room view looking toward the back patio.
A living room view looking toward the back patio.
Another view of the dining and living room areas.
Another view of the dining and living room areas.
A view toward the back patio and the door to the bathroom.
A view toward the back patio and the door to the bathroom.
A good look at the kitchen.
A good look at the kitchen.
View of the shower and bathroom.
View of the shower and bathroom.
Bathroom vanity.
Bathroom vanity.
A view of the shower showing the rising angle of the ceiling.
A view of the shower showing the rising angle of the ceiling.
Showing the shower and the ample window that provides a view to the backyard.
Showing the shower and the ample window that provides a view to the backyard.

Mid Century Modern concepts apply to Andrea’s. By replacing the walls with glass and exposing a post and lintel system, the leap to constructions of the past is easily imaginable. This tiny house suitably functions as a guest or beach house as well as a diminutive residence. One of the appealing features of this dwelling is the that dimensions and the use of standard materials, including the lack of interior complexity, achieves a modest cost in building.

HBosler

http://www.midcenturymoderngroovy.com

 

Self-protrait

Modern Tiny House, Miley’s

This post originally appeared on Mid Century Modern Groovy:

Miley’s Tiny House

Explanation of why the subject of a tiny house is suitable for a blog devoted to Mid Century Modern does not come easily. Admittedly, the answers I have to such a question are rather weak and without significant justification. Even so, Mid Century Modern in essence is modern. The designs of this period still possess great appeal to contemporary designers and bring forth designs that could comfortably coexist with structures built during the middle of the 20th century. Mid Century Modern Groovy was never intended to be so strictly composed as to exclude articles of interest to anyone who enjoys the modern aesthetic. Also, besides having an enjoyment in designing tiny houses, I have an enthusiasm for modern design. So, therefore….

Miley's Tiny House Floor Plan
Miley’s Tiny House Floor Plan

Miley’s tiny house is an ultra-modern design seeking to break up the rectangle while applying a square. The design above was actually a personal challenge to set down a scheme confined within a square. The results of this challenge, I think, are largely successful. The follow series of images not only shows the design from various perspectives, but also shows it as it develops.

This view is from the southwest and shows the windows to the kitchen and bedroom, the patio off of the kitchen and part of the wall of the living room. As can be seen, the house is set on a large square, in this case composed of polished stone.

This view is as we move north along the west side of the building.

This view is from the west looking east. The compelling design element from this direction is the wedge that projects to cut off the paved area to the south. This house makes the most of the outdoors as we will see as we proceed toward the main patio area.

This view shows the door to the kitchen and the angle of the living room painted in a different color. Color is used in this house to accentuate the form of the architectural details. This also gives the illusion of greater space since the eye is led to different areas based on the function emphasized by the color.

Here we are looking to the southeast directly through double doors into the living room. These doors are more for the feeling of open space rather than to use as an entrance. We also get a peep at the angular nature of the layout.

A little better look, this time from the north looking south.

Now, we finally get a clear look at the main patio off of the living room and dining room. We also see to the left a door that leads to the bathroom, which can also be accessed from the inside.

We can now see into the living room, dining room, with a peek into part of the kitchen. Notice the outdoor furniture and the globular sculpture. Due to the angles of this house and the various areas separated from each other, sculpture would work very well, even if this is a tiny house.

We look now east to west and see the bathroom jutting out from the center of the structure.

We are beginning to come back around.

Here the sculptural quality of the house brings attention to a geometric sculpture.

We continue around the building.

A closer view of the windows to the bedroom and kitchen.

A little further.

This is the main patio at dusk with landscape lighting.

This image is heading in an opposite direction from our start, looking into the living room with the addition of another sculpture.

Going further.

The door off of the kitchen.

The delightful view of the kitchen patio and the area off the bedroom.

Here we see the dramatic outdoor lighting and the movement of the sculpture to the corner of the bedroom and bathroom.

A better look.

Here we get the full effect of the use of landscape lights used to integrate the house together as a work of sculpture. Blue is infused in all the colors. Yet the underlying warm colors mute the coolness of the blues.

The full effect of the strong colors against the grass and white of this view, brings us into the house.

Here we get a look at the living room through the patio doors. The doors are meant to fold up wide to bring the outdoor area in. Yet the bright, epoxy floors not only spotlight the colors and shapes of the furniture, but also provide a separation between other places in the house and outdoors.

We get a view from inside the living room. Notice the beanbag chair? After all, this is Mid Century Modern Groovy!

Classic chairs and table.

Here we get a more inclusive view of the living and dining room.

We get to see into the kitchen and the window to the outside as well as the door to the kitchen patio.

This is the bathroom. To the left is the door that goes out to the main patio. We saw the door to the bathroom, door off the dining area to the left. The door on the right goes to the bedroom.

The bathroom again, this time we see a reflection of the furniture on the main patio.

The bedroom with yellow bed.

The bedroom again looking at the closet.

A view of the kitchen looking into the living room.

Back outside with the violet light shining on the bathroom wall.

The main patio with the globular sculpture accented by a strong yellow light suggesting primary colors.

The addition of a green accent lamp.

Highlighting the sculpture at the southeast corner of the house.

A full look at the bathroom from the location of the shower.

This completes this tour of Miley’s Tiny House. This house is less than 400 square feet, yet the open nature of the access to the house from the exterior makes it seem much larger. As repeated frequently in this tour, the house has a modern sculptural design that uses color and other architectural elements to blend the parts into a whole. The long windows that mimic the doors establishes a cohesive vertical flow around the house. Although different, strong colors are used, those differences bind them to the design as well as section areas apart. This house would not be the same without the use of color in the locations designed for them. Possibly a different combination could be used, but the use of color is essential. A contemporary beige or grey would look dreadful. For me, this is just too good to design a structure that must use color over neutrals. How Mid Century Modern groovy of me!

Howard Bosler

http://www.midcenturymoderngroovy.com

All About Modern Tiny Houses