Tag Archives: ultra-modern

Peter’s Tiny House

Peter’s Tiny House is one based on my favorite geometric shape, the square. Although a great part of this square belongs to the outdoors, this tiny house has a substantial feeling of space. The house occupies 469 sq. ft. of enclosed space with 256 sq. ft. of covered patio.

The floor plan consists of 3 distinct architectural areas: the living room and bathroom area, the kitchen and dining area and the bedroom. The living room/bathroom and the bedroom radiate from the central kitchen in rectangles, whereas the kitchen maintains a square mimicking the overall shape of the entire structure.

Peter's Tiny House Floor Plan
Peter’s Tiny House Floor Plan

Each section maintains a different roofline, with the kitchen area the highest at 12 feet. The various areas gather further distinction by the use of different materials. The kitchen square brandishes a natural stone covering, while the rest of the house is sheathed in steel, except for the patio which introduces bleached wood siding. The use of different materials serves to accent different aspects of the architecture. The stone covering around the kitchen continues inside to accentuate the central nature of this room.

Diversion from the square occurs along the roofline of the bedroom and patio. It extends out to accommodate the modern column providing support. On the matter of the column, the pure blue of the column provides a color contrast to the warmer colors in the stone and to enhance the effect of the steel and bleached wood. It also provides a balance with the brighter colors inside, granting the blue part of the primary colors from the yellow on the walls and the red floor in the kitchen.

Peter's Tiny House Roof Over Patio and Bedroom.
Peter’s Tiny House Roof Over Patio and Bedroom.

 

Front of Peter's Tiny House.
Front of Peter’s Tiny House.
Directly in Front.
Directly in Front.
Front at an Angle.
Front at an Angle.
Side of House.
Side of House.
Side and Patio View Showing Different Roof-lines.
Side and Patio View Showing Different Roof-lines.
Side, Patio and Back of Peter's Tiny House.
Side, Patio and Back of Peter’s Tiny House.
Patio and Back Side View.
Patio and Back Side View.
Back of house with the bedroom section on the right.
Back of house with the bedroom section on the right.
Back and corner of the house.
Back and corner of the house.
Side opposite of patio with the bedroom section on the left and the kitchen area on the right.
Side opposite of patio with the bedroom section on the left and the kitchen area on the right. The combination of narrow and wider windows on corners of the house repeats around the house.
Coming back around to the front showing the stone clad kitchen section with the bedroom on the left and the front on the right.
Coming back around to the front showing the stone clad kitchen section with the bedroom on the left and the front on the right.
Front door with the kitchen on the right and the living room/bathroom on the left.
Front door with the kitchen on the right and the living room/bathroom on the left.
Living room looking towards kitchen with the bathroom on the left.
Living room looking towards kitchen with the bathroom on the left.
Looking toward the kitchen from the living room.
Looking toward the kitchen from the living room.
Looking at the living room from the kitchen with the patio to the left.
Looking at the living room from the kitchen with the patio to the left.
Looking up at the clerestory windows surrounding the bathroom.
Looking up at the clerestory windows surrounding the bathroom.
Another look at the bathroom clerestory windows.
Another look at the bathroom clerestory windows.
Looking up inside the bathroom.
Looking up inside the bathroom.
In the bathroom, looking toward the vanity and door.
In the bathroom, looking toward the vanity and door.
View of bathroom floor, looking toward the shower cabinet.
View of bathroom floor, looking toward the shower cabinet.
The shower cabinet.
The shower cabinet.
Kitchen counter and cabinets. The living room is to the left.
Kitchen counter and cabinets. The living room is to the left.
Dining area with the door to the bedroom on the right.
Dining area with the door to the bedroom on the right.
Showing the kitchen ceiling and its clerestory windows and pendant light.
Showing the kitchen ceiling and its clerestory windows and pendant light.
Kitchen area with the door to the bedroom on the left and the living room on the right.
Kitchen area with the door to the bedroom on the left and the living room on the right.
Door to the bedroom.
Door to the bedroom.
View of front door and living room.
View of front door and living room.
Showing the door to the kitchen from the bedroom with the patio on the left.
Showing the door to the kitchen from the bedroom with the patio on the left.
The patio on the left.
The patio on the left.
Patio door.
Patio door.
Looking at bed with the patio on the right and the dresser on the left.
Looking at bed with the patio on the right and the dresser on the left.
Dresser in the bedroom.
Dresser in the bedroom.
On the patio.
On the patio.

 

This design puts forth the strong idea that a modern look at the simplest geometric forms leads to an infinite number of possibilities. As can be seen in the main floor-plan, the foot print of this house forms a perfect square, which is hardly creatively restrictive. By switching sections of this design, by making the patio in the area of the bedroom and visa versa, for instance, one could free up space for a two bedroom house or a much larger bedroom. Even so, this house occupies less than 500 sq. ft., yet is quite spacious.

This is a little video I made of this house design:

HBosler

Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait

 

 

 

 

 

The Round House

The Round House is based on mid-century modern styles, except this time on a more organic and less International flair. A juxtaposition of curved and rectilinear forms, although they might seem in conflict, produces an interesting contrast between the opposing thrusts in the design.

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Front entrance to the Round House showing the roof over the bedroom and front portico.

 

The building is composed of two cylinders of different heights with cantilevered roofs projecting over separate areas, one, the front entrance and the other an enclosed private patio. Also, the two roofs are composed of different materials, further separating the two visually. The split between the two halves are further delineated by color, the bedroom/bath is dark in color and the living/kitchen area is white. Introduction of a rectangular front porch as well as a rectangular private patio, mirrors the roof structure, with the roofs providing a practical cover for both. For the cylinders that make up the two distinct areas of the design, the outer walls should properly be constructed with a visually smooth, paintable surface such as fine textured stucco or metal. A cement block or brick surface would diminish the overall aesthetic. However, with significant changes, this house could use a variety of materials and finishes.

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A better view of the two roof lines and clerestory windows.

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A view of the side of the house with a look at the curving form of the taller section.

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Beginning to see the sculptural nature of the two semicircles.

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The metal roof casts interesting shadows against the curved, white surface.

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The soft curves of living/kitchen area starkly contrast with the sharp angles of the roof and private patio on the right.

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The differences between shapes and shadows reminds me of paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe of Santa Fe structures.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe, Ranchos Church, Number 1, 1929, oil on canvas, Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL.

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Coming around to the other side we see the enclosed, private patio covered by the cantilevered roof of the tallest semicircle.

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A direct side view displaying the different roof elevations and the contrast between dark and white.

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We see the repetition and rise of the angular forms and the windows which only face the front.

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The long stretches of roof thrust in different directions. The long, short stone wall helps to weaken the stark dark and white influence by introducing natural colors all along the front, directing the eye to the front entrance.

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We get a closer look at the front portico.

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Peeking into the front window at the living room.

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On the other side of the front window with a view of the front portico. The wall on the right hides the kitchenette and small dining area.

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Looking into the dining area with the wall to the kitchenette on the left.

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Looking back toward the front entrance and living room.

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The dining area on the right and the kitchenette on the left. The door on the left leads to the bathroom and the door to the right to the bedroom.

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The kitchenette with the door to the right to the bathroom.

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The bathroom which is formed from the  curved outer wall and a curved inside wall that altogether is like a Gothic arch.

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Outside the bathroom door and in the bedroom. The vanity for the bathroom is in the main space of the bedroom, much like one would see in a hotel.

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Looking across the curve of the bedroom with the glass door on the right to the private patio.

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Seeing through the glass doors into the private patio.

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Looking back toward the bedroom.

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The Round House Floor Plan

 

Obviously, the Round House is composed of two half-cylinders with rectangular areas on either side of their union. The cantilevered roofs give covers for each end of the design. The private patio is just that, very private due to the high walls creating total seclusion off the bedroom, with the roof still 4 feet from the top of the patio walls. Windows are limited to the front and high clerestory windows provide a lot of light without diluting the space for furniture and wall space. In order to also offer this light to the bathroom, the surrounding walls (not seen in the images) go up 8 feet, 2 feet below the ceiling, allowing light from the clerestory windows to leak in.

As difficult as it is to design suitable space using circular forms, this particular design is quite flexible. By changing the roofs or changing surrounding spaces, the house can look and live very differently. Having recently examined a Frank Lloyd Wright house in Phoenix, Arizona that uses his trademark round shapes, I have already produced a variation on this house with a strong influence of Wright and will post that very soon. Keep watching.

HBosler

Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait

 

Charlie’s Tiny House: Mid Century Modern

Using the same inspiring mid-century modern arch from Patricia’s Tiny House, I have separated the form, similar to a pilaster, from surface decoration and surrounded a tiny dwelling ¾ of the way with arches. Charlie’s Tiny House, much like Patricia’s is totally influenced by the modernity of 20th century American design. The introduction of curved shapes while maintaining an overall rectilinear plan is seen over and over again in modern architecture from dinners such as Sambo’s to burger joints such as McDonald’s.

  

Sambo’s restaurants were an incredible source of mid-century architecture, which included fanciful roofs, rough stone walls and long stretches of windows. Most were original and delightfully playful in their artistic exuberance.


1587 Shawano Avenue, Green Bay, Wisconsin, McDonald’s Speedee Sign, Built:   c1959, Style:   Mid-Century Commercial, Singular example of iconic McDonald’s metal and neon sign dating to the late 1950’s in Wisconsin. Features include the company’s trademark mascot, “Speedee,” and golden arch design.   This sign remains in its original location, and was recently restored.  

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The “front entrance” of Charlie’s Tiny House.

 

I have never understood some preconceived notions about house design such as the aspect facing the street should have a front entrance. Famous mid-century modern architects many times set the entrance back, hid the front facing the street with sculpted block or walls and reserved walls of glass for the unseen areas in the so-called back of the house. Charlie’s does not necessarily have a front, but does have entrances. The two doors at the corner of the house lighten the heavy effect of the red stained, wood covered exterior and balance the two long windows on either side.

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A more direct view of the “front”.

The Rietveld chairs, combined with a Platner coffee table, sets a mid-century modern mood, which continues around the rest of the veranda. Mid-century pendant lamps keep the influence going.

Gerrit Thomas Rietveld (1888-1964), Dutch, active 20th century, Red-Blue Chair, designed 1917–18, produced ca. 1950, Painted beech and plywood, Layton Art Collection, Inc., Milwaukee Art Museum. Photo credit: John Nienhuis

 

Charlie's Tiny House3.pngA corner of the house showing the continuation of the yellow arches, the tall, narrow windows of the bedroom and the cement planters.

Charlie's Tiny House4.pngDirect view of the veranda with the Wassily Chairs by Marcel Breuer, 1925.

Charlie's Tiny House5.pngComing around the corner.

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Straight on view of the side opposite the “front” entrances showing the boulder garden, Lombardi poplars and the French doors leading to the kitchen/dining room.

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An oblique view.

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A closer look exposing the cement, elevated planters and the Grand Confort Chairs by Le Corbusier.

Grand Confort Chair by Le Corbusier (1929).

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This image displays the side of the house with the sanded, stained and clear coated wood strips reflecting the living area extension. The casement window at the roof line is repeated inside.

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Image looking back toward the raised planters and boulder garden.

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Direct view of the side with an entrance on the right.

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Back around to the “front” entrances with a better look at the Rietveld “de Stijl” chairs.

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Coming in through one of the “front” entrances and seeing the living area. The door is to the bathroom. Notice the window above the door.

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A less elevated look at the living area with the door to the bathroom ahead.

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The television console with the door to the bedroom to the right, the door to the bathroom on the left and the dining area straight ahead.

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The bedroom with the two long windows.

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The bedroom with desk and wardrobe.

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Out of the bedroom and looking at the kitchen/dining area. Notice the windows to the bedroom and to the bathroom.

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The kitchen and dining area with the French doors to the veranda on the left.

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The dining area and French doors to the veranda.

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The bathroom covered on the left with the same material on the exterior of the house.

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The bathroom with the door to the living area on the right.

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The bathroom windows.

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Looking back toward the entrances.

This small house is only around 360 sq. ft. and appears much larger due to the ceiling height at 12 ft. The long windows not only let in considerable light, but  also produce a feeling of greater space. One other advantage of tall walls is the ability to hang large artwork which produces a feeling of spaciousness as well.

Charlie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

HBosler

http://www.moderntinyhouse.org

self-portrait-in-red200.jpg

Darla’s Tiny House

This particular design is entirely open which, along with the tall ceilings, creates a feeling of spaciousness. Also, because of the simple open space inside, the activity areas are easily changed. However, because of the orientation of the entrance, the best layout generally is the one portrayed.

The floor plan is rather simple, but attempts an artistic flare with successive vertical rectilinear forms and a walk-through that brings one to the front door. The bathroom has a different roof line and compliments the recess that forms the entrance.

Darla's tiny house floor plan.
Darla’s tiny house floor plan.
Darla's Tiny House3
The front of the house with its’ simple ordered design. Primarily cinder-block, the house is 346 sq. ft.
This is the front of the house with an alternate configuration.
This is the front of the house with an alternate configuration having an entrance instead of a window.
The alternate configuration at night.
The alternate configuration at night.
A straight-on view of the front.
A straight-on view of the front. The front entrance is to the left walk-way, around the corner.
Proceeding around to the side patio.
Proceeding around to the side patio.
The patio and beginning to see some of the bathroom extension.
The patio and beginning to see some of the bathroom extension.
A closer look at the patio.
A closer look at the patio and a side of the bathroom extension. Notice the design of the roof lines.
The patio and bathroom extension.
The patio and bathroom extension.
The back of the bathroom extension.
The back of the bathroom extension. Notice how the corners on the right mimic the roof line on the left.
Here we see the entrance and the vertical sculptural forms that leads to it.
Here we see the entrance and the vertical, sculptural forms that leads to it, emphasizing the rectilinear design.
Showing the north side of the house.
Showing the north side of the house.
North elevation.
North elevation.
North side view at a higher elevation.
North side view at a higher elevation.
Looking at the walk-through to the entrance.
Looking at the walk-through to the entrance.
The entrance.
The entrance.
Peeking through the entry door into the living area.
Peeking through the entry door into the living area.
The living area and the sleeping area.
The living area and the sleeping area.
A dining area with the bed to the left.
A dining area with the bed to the left.
Kitchen/dining area with the living area and entrance to the right.
Kitchen/dining area with the living area and entrance to the right.
Looking back from the bed
Looking back from the bed, across the living area with the entrance to the left and the bathroom door directly ahead.
The bathroom vanity.
The bathroom vanity.
Standing in the shower cabinet
Standing in the shower cabinet, looking through to the closet with the vanity on the right.
Standing in front of the closet
Standing in front of the closet and looking back toward the shower cabinet and toilet.

 

One of the nicest part of this design is the simplicity, and therefore, the ease at which this house could be constructed. Most likely the cost is low to produce this structure because of the lack of segmentation. The only separate space is the bathroom. Not only would this tiny house work as a main residence, but would work well as a comfy guest house. Another significant cost reduction would occur due to the use of standard items such as windows and doors. This little house maybe simple; yet it is artistically pleasing.

HBosler

Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait

Theodore’s Tiny House

This tiny house design is only 240 sq. ft. The concept of this house without a loft is the utilization of a pullout sofa for sleeping. The floor plan is rather simple with two rectangles, one serving as a bath and the remaining area the living and kitchen areas. Dining is done on the patio or a folding table inside.

Theodore's-tiny-house-floor-plan
Theodore’s-tiny-house-floor-plan
Theodore's Tiny House
The side of Theodore’s tiny house showing the living room window.
Theodore's Tiny House
Direct view of the large window to the living room/kitchen.
Theodore's Tiny House
Coming around to the entrance to the tiny house.
Theodore's Tiny House
Direct view of the patio and entrance. I should mention that the chair models were designed by me and exist in the real world except I use them as dinning chairs.
Theodore's Tiny House
Another view of the patio.
Theodore's Tiny House
Further around to the side.
Theodore's Tiny House
Side of tiny house.
Theodore's Tiny House
Moving to the back of the house, facing the exterior walls of the bathroom.
Theodore's Tiny House
The same view, but during the day.
Theodore's Tiny House
Facing the exterior wall of the kitchen.
Theodore's Tiny House
Looking from the patio into the living/kitchen area.
Theodore's Tiny House
Kitchen area.
Theodore's Tiny House
Living area.
Theodore's Tiny House
Media center or possibly storage area or both. Also showing door to bathroom.
Theodore's Tiny House
In the bathroom.
Theodore's Tiny House
In the bathroom pointed at storage cabinet for clothes and shoes.
Theodore's Tiny House
Vanity in bathroom.

Due to the wall on the side that extends past the house on each side and forms part of the front entrance and patio, the house will have an appearance of a much substantial dwelling. The overhanging roof provides a visually interesting form as one travels around the small house.

HBosler

self-portrait-in-red
Self-Portrait

Julie’s Tiny House Design

Julie’s tiny house is, as with other recent designs, based upon the square. In fact, the house is composed of 8’ x 8’ squares. This leads to the idea of modularization, where the components of the structure are built elsewhere and then delivered later to the construction area. The vaulted area over the dining area is meant purely to open the central space up, while providing architectural decoration.

Julie's Tiny House Floor Plan
Julie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

 

Julie's House Design 1.png

We start at the back of the house, looking through the large bedroom window with a covered patio to the left and accessible from the bedroom. The exterior lights are off except for the overhead patio light.

 

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Lights on!

 

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Lights on at sunset.

 

Julie's House Design 4.pngWe’re headed around the side toward the front.

 

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The side of the house with the front entry and porch to the right.

 

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The front entrance.

 

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The front of the house. The floor of this house is a highly polished stone and the reason for the high reflectivity.

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The front of the house almost straight on showing another corner patio. The wall directly facing us is the kitchen.

Julie's House Design 9.pngHere we see a window to the kitchen overlooking a little covered patio with a planter.

Julie's House Design 10.png

Proceeding to the other side of the house with a view of the windows to the bathroom and a slight look at the patio off the bedroom.

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A direct side view with the window to the kitchen on the left and the bedroom patio doors on the right. The bathroom is, of course, seen through the two windows in the center.

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The bedroom patio.

 

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We return to a side view with the large window to the bedroom.

 

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A view of the corner that has no patio.

 

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At the front entrance, looking up into the round window to the vaulted area.

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We’ve entered the front door and see the living area. To the right is the dining area and we can get a peek at the bedroom through the glass door.

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Looking through the living area into the dining area, seeing the glass door to the bathroom, with the kitchen to the right.

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The dining area and the kitchen beyond.

 

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Looking back towards the living area and the front entrance.

 

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In the bathroom with a look through the glass door on the right into the kitchen.

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On the opposite side of the bathroom with a peek out of the glass door into the dining area.

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A view of the bedroom while to the left through the glass door is a view of the front entrance and living area.

Julie's House Design 24.pngAcross the bedroom seeing the patio doors with the door to the dining and living areas to the right.

Julie's House Design 25.pngLooking inside the square, vaulted area above the dining area with the large round windows.

Julie's House Design 26.pngExternal view of the vaulted area. The roof could also be made into an elevated deck.

You may have noticed a classical feature of this house is that it is based upon a Greek cross, much like some cathedrals. Although the round windows could be replaced with square ones, the intriguing juxtaposition of perfect square to perfect round would be lost. You may also have noticed that the warm colors of green and yellow orange on the outside, contrast with the cool colors of the inside, although other color schemes might work with this house built upon the cube.

HBosler

 

self-portrait-in-red200.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Howie’s Tiny House

This tiny house is simply a rectangle, but it shows what can be done with such a simple geometric structure. The fortunate thing about a simple rectangle is that it is the least expensive. As for the lack of an elevated support, I live in a desert environment and tend to think in those terms. Here, many houses are built on slabs without any thought to a basement, or an attic for that matter. Also, a flat roof has no possibility of collapse due to snow. In future, designs may include at least shed roofs, with the occasional gabled roof along the lines of American Mid-Century Modern.

Howie's Tiny House Floor Plan
Howie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

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The long patio at night, looking through the foliage.

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The long patio at night.

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The long patio in the afternoon.

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The long patio during the afternoon, looking toward the front of the house.

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Looking directly at the long patio in the afternoon.

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The long patio at night, looking at the front corner of the house.

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Corner of house at noon.

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Front of the house during the afternoon.

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Front at noon.

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Front corner of house in the afternoon.

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Side of house mid-morning.

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Backside of house mid-morning.

Tiny House 1 - 9-1-14 7-40-14 PM.pngHouse with roof off to give orientation.

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Looking at couch and front door.

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Looking at living area.

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Another living area view.

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Looking at storage closet facing bathroom entrance with living area and kitchen on either side.

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View of kitchen, looking toward bedroom.

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Kitchen and dining area with the bathroom entrance to the left.

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Dining area with the front door to the right.

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Looking back toward the living room

Tiny House 9.pngBathroom.

 

Tiny House 10.pngBathroom and bedroom view.

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Bedroom, fish eyed for context.

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Turning toward the front door.

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On the bed, looking to the back patio door.

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Looking out the patio door.

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Turned back around to look at the bedroom.

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Looking through the patio door into the bedroom.

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A final look with the roof off.

Although this house looks ample in size, the indoor square footage is only 239. The outdoors is used as a major extension to the roominess of the overall design. In fact, in such a house, in the right environment, the temptation would be to spend considerable hours outside.

HBosler

http://ultramoderntinyhouse.wordpress.com

 

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This Site Is For Those Of Us That Go Modern All The Way

I’ve always thought that shabby-chic is basically shabby with no chic, that rustic is unfinished, and country is an outhouse. Only modern and preferably ultra-modern here.

This site will present various posts about actual modern tiny homes, but will also include designs and ideas. Besides enjoying designing furniture, I enjoy designing tiny houses. I used to use the old architectural method of media on paper. However, these days digital methods occupy a lot of my time.

At any rate, nothing is formal here and will be presented as time and inclination dictates. As a side note, I generally give designs names of individuals as a personable way of remembering them.

Ronnie's Tiny House 13
Ronnie’s Tiny House 13

Ronnie’s Tiny House by Popular Demand

This article is originally from http://www.midcenturymoderngroovy.com.

I keep getting requests for my tiny house designs. Since architecture is art, and even though the subject of tiny houses is not the primary purpose of this website, the houses I design are always modern with a wink at Mid Century Modern. Even so, modern tiny houses are groovy!

Ronnie's Tiny House Floor Plan
Ronnie’s Tiny House Floor Plan

Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance

Much like Andrea’s Tiny House, this house is based on the square, in this case two overlapping squares. (Again, I live in a desert environment where houses are built on slabs, so I haven’t included a raised foundation.) Aesthetically, as with Andrea’s, circular windows contrasts with the rectilinear forms. To follow the circular windows around the structure, the door repeats this motif. The following images are day views.

Ronnie’s Tiny House Front
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front

One gets the full effect of the circles and squares from a front view.

Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio and Back
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio and Back
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View
Ronnie’s Tiny House Opposite Side from Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Opposite Side from Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Near Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Near Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Later in Evening
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View Later in Evening
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View, Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side View, Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night, Lights off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night, Lights off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back View at Night Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back and Side View at Night Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Back and Side View at Night Lights On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Patio View at Early Evening Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Patio View at Early Evening Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio View at Dusk Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Side Patio View at Dusk Lights Off
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Corner View at Dusk Just Street Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Corner View at Dusk Just Street Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front View Straight On at Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front View Straight On at Dusk
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front and Side View at Dusk Entry Light On
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Front Entrance

 

Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area

Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area

Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking at Patio Doors
Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking at Patio Doors
Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking Toward Bathroom Door and Way Toward Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Living Area Looking Toward Bathroom Door and Way Toward Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Toward Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Toward Front Entrance
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Through Patio Doors Onto Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Through Patio Doors Onto Patio
Ronnie’s Tiny House Bathroom
Ronnie’s Tiny House Bathroom
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Into Bathroom and at the Door to the Living Area
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Back Into Bathroom and at the Door to the Living Area
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into Dining Area with Door to Bathroom on the Right
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into Dining Area with Door to Bathroom on the Right
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Toward the Door to the Patio and the Door to the Bathroom on the Left
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking Toward the Door to the Patio and the Door to the Bathroom on the Left
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into the Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking into the Kitchen
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking From the Kitchen into the Dining Area
Ronnie’s Tiny House Looking From the Kitchen into the Dining Area

Admittedly, the kitchen is rather tight and would benefit from the exterior wall in the direction of the front being pushed out a couple of feet. However, this design would still work if the appliances and cabinets were on a smaller scale. This house is around 300 square feet and I will append a floor plan as soon as available. As a hint to orientation, follow the windows. The house is made of two squares where the corners of the squares overlap and form a square that makes the bathroom. One goes through a door in the living area into the bathroom and then another door that leads to the laundry/dining/kitchen area.

I have other very modern designs and will post those at regular intervals.

HBosler

http://www.midcenturymoderngroovy.com

 

Self-Portrati
Self-Portrati